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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Everyone talks about a Bug Out Bag so they can leave their home at a moments notice and survive. Well, what about the opposite? What if your away from home and need to get back?

Locally, we had a storm event a few months back that shut down the interstate and roads for 10 hours, stranding people in there cars for the entire time. In that situation, most people were too far from home to walk back, especially in freezing conditions. But what if you did need to ditch a vehicle? What do you have on hand to help you make it to your destination?

I have a small bag that sits in the floorboard on the transmission hump in my truck. Its kind of a catch all since the center console is pretty small, but should the need arise, I could grab it quickly as I leave the truck and be fairly well prepared.

It has a sheath knife. Extra ammo for the truck gun. Rat shot for same. Raincoat. Emergency blanket. Sunglasses. Bottle of water. Lighter, phone charger, large zip ties, flagging tape. There is also a beach towel under it that it sits on that I would grab if I needed to get home. Plus some other random stuff that migrated into it over time.

Its mainly just the stuff I use regularly or dont want to get damaged in the tool box. If I had the time, there is some other gear I would grab from the toolbox. Depending on the area and how far I needed to go I would grab a hiking stick w/ compass in the handle (Compass would be a good addition to the bag) either a saw, hatchet or both, tarp and duct tape. Probably a can of WD40 as well for an easy fire starter.
 

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A smart idea. In the winter I usually throw in the car an extra blanket, water and some protein bars in the console. Just in case. I keep a "shake as you go" flashlight in the door bin year round.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good item I didnt think to mention. Flashlight is in the door pocket and a headlamp is in the center console. Both would be grabbed if leaving the vehicle.
 

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I keep a few things in my car and much more in the winter, since you never know around here. Have a couple blankets just due to my dogs riding in the back---one covers the sponge in back, and a 'down' one is for covering frozen groceries. Always keep extra winter clothing---scarf, hat, gloves, etc. This is the first year I didn't put extra boots in the car. And while reading this, realized I DON'T put extra socks in the car! Always have water in the car, though smaller bottles. Tiny bit of some sort of food item, but this is mainly so I don't go shopping hungry..........doesn't always work!

I want to get one of those tools that break out a window. Have to decide where I would put it so I could 'get to it'........the glove compartment is not too practical.

Does anyone have one of these??
 

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Definitely a good idea. Living on a ferry-dependent island, if we were a minute late getting home in the evening, we didn't get home. (Hint: If you ever find yourself living in this situation, program the phone number of the ferry toll booth into your cellphone's speed-dial. Maybe they will wait for you.) We kept a tote in the trunk with essentials: toothbrushes, underwear, etc., in case of an unplanned overnight stay somewhere.

Living in a rural area, a flashlight is a permanent item in the glovebox.

We also kept tire chains in the trunk in winter, regardless of the weather forecast. Had to use them too, one time when there was an un-forecast sudden snowstorm. Don't forget work gloves for installing them, and maybe a grundgy windbreaker to throw over your other clothes. Installing tire chains is a dirty job; you are up to your elbows in tire slush.

We are moving to the other end of the country, so we will have to re-plan our emergency car supplies. Perhaps a blanket in winter, since the climate is colder there.

I want to get one of those tools that break out a window. Have to decide where I would put it so I could 'get to it'........the glove compartment is not too practical.
That's a great idea. I should get one. Along with that, get a serrated knife that is made for cutting seat belts. You'd get both at a place that supplies fire department equipment.
 

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That's a great idea. I should get one. Along with that, get a serrated knife that is made for cutting seat belts. You'd get both at a place that supplies fire department equipment.
The tool I have seen........and have in mind, has the "cutter" on it too. Here is an example........

Seatbelt Cutter Window Breaker Emergency Escape Tool : Amazon.com : Automotive

Years ago knew a guy that had a wreck--car ended up on it's roof--- and because he couldn't get his seat belt cut he hung there until someone came along..........scary!! If he would have ended up in the water..........well...:thud:........and he was traveling along a river.

And my idea about getting the item was reinforced a couple weeks back when the news showed a car plunging into water as a life saving type of news item. You have 20 SECONDS while your car is sinking to get the window down--------(do this as one of the first things if power windows).......get seat belt undone and get out.......YIKES! Gave examples of people escaping.......including with kids in the car, and any people in the back set.........scary stuff!

There was this one..............that goes ON the seat belt (which is where you would want it---IMHO!!) but reviews were only so-so........and I want two..............one for each seat belt in front.

http://www.crkt.com/ExiTool-Seat-Belt-Cutter-Window-Breaker-LED-Flashlight-Tool
 

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I grew up near the Mississippi. People were always getting drunk and driving into the river and drowning. I refuse to own a vehicle with power windows and locks because of it. Too many of them died because they couldn't get their windows open. And, if you don't get them open fast enough, you have to wait until the car fills up with water and the pressure equalizes. I am severely claustrophobic. Yeah...I would panic and die.
 

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We bought my MIL one of those window breaking seat belt cutters for Christmas. Because it had a tire gauge and she wanted one. It was all in one. I need to grab one.

I saw a news report of a kid who was playing around in the car when the parent was talking outside. She got her head stuck in the seatbelt and the parent had to cut the belt. Scary!

We just recently redid our emergency bag for our truck. First aid, blanket, flashlight, stuff for the kids. Etc. I'm adding one of those multi tools ASAP!
 

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I'm trying to get a combo of a bug out bag/ get home bag due to the fact a work about 20miles from home and work 6pm-11pm. Add in the fact I go out there every two weeks with a todder and there's no way I'm walking home in one day if she's with me. I always keep extra diapers,wipes and at least one blanket depending on the season. Trying to figure out food but cant find how many caloroies a 3yr old needs per day. Also have very light one person tent we could both sleep in if need be.
 

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. I'm adding one of those multi tools ASAP!
I would think that you would want TWO..........one for each seat belt in front. Then the other person could also have access to some sort of help to get the people/kids/etc. out of the back seat............if just one person has it could be much slower..........or not even work at all if that person is knocked out and passenger can't get to it.

I would get one for my back seat too but my seat is always down flat so don't think I will. But will get two of them for sure!
 

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I have an every day carry bag that goes with me whenever I leave my house (even to mow the lawn) that has a knife, fire starting items, water bottle/filter, rain coat, flashlight (key chain size), jerky

I have a kit for my car/work that has the above items plus 3 day supply of food, more water, extra set of clothing, 1 week's supply of my meds, blanket, tarp, paracord, shake flash light, 3 sets of heat packs (ones for hands/toes/body that are air activated - just snap and apply) small first aid kit, hygiene items.

at home is our bug out bags. . .
 

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I consider a bug out bag and a get home bag as one in the same. My bug out bag has everything you could need to survive in the wilderness, and will provide the essentials, shelter, fire, water, and food.
I carry it everywhere I go, and in the winter i carry a plastic tote with a lot more stuff because winter survival is the toughest survival of all.
Living in the north getting stranded in a snow storm is a very real possibility, so my tote has extra food, blankets, clothes, candles, batteries, etc. I also keep a large bottle of peppermint shnapps because it doesn't freeze! I never drink the stuff but when you are cold, it gives you a warm feeling on the way down. I also keep a battery powered cell phone charger and a portable 40 channel CB radio so communications would always be possible.
 
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