Frugal Village Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
615 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering if anyone has studied from one of the online courses that are offered from some colleges? I received some information from Devry and others similar to it. I thought it would be nice to do some classes at night and get some education along the way. But, I am not sure because I don't know any employer will recognize it as a "real" certificate or not. Would you please tell me some more information if you had tried this or not. Thank you once again for your information.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,446 Posts
I've taken about 12 online courses. Not through these online schools, but through a real brick & mortor school (SUNY) that offers online classes. I would suggest looking for local colleges/universities that offer this. Most do nowadays. And you can be sure they are accredited and can offer/accept federal grants as payment.

By the way, I have HATED every online class I have taken. There's tons of busywork to make up for the lack of sitting at a desk/classtime interaction which I think is a load of bull. I'm currently taking what I hope will be my last online class EVER.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,416 Posts
The community college I go to offers quite a few online classes. I haven't taken any online though, I need to sit in a classroom and have an instructor teach me the material. A friend of mine has taken online classes there and liked it because she could do the work when she got home from her job or on the weekend, whenever it was most convenient for her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,725 Posts
I have been going through St. Leo University (brick and mortar school out of Tampa). It hasn't been that hard to squeeze in the required work and I have enjoyed it. They are a bit pricier than some others, but the credits are more likely to transfer.
 

·
Technical Support Sleuth
Joined
·
6,481 Posts
I am going to school full-time at University of Phoenix online. It's kind of pricey but I really like it. I like not having to go to an actual location. Each class is different and in some classes there is more work that I like, but I do homework on my lunch break and etc. to keep the headache of all the work down. My employer is actually paying for my courses so I am sure they'll accept it. And University of Phoenix is nationally accredited. Just make sure you go to a nationally credited school!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
When I moved here I took 2 classes online. But after having DD2 I didn't have time to think or study so instead of taking a "fail/withdraw" I paid my brother-in-law to take the classes for me.

...bad teresa, I know. But I was already half way through them. I haven't gone back since- but that's because I don't have time.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,446 Posts
Also, be aware...most online college courses are NOT self-paced. Meaning you can't save up all the work to do in one big hunk. Just like other classes, you have due dates, exams, and other requirements.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
373 Posts
I agree with the others - just make sure it's a certified school that you can get an actual diploma from at the end if you so choose. Lots of schools offer online courses. I'm taking one this semester, and I like not having to go to class. The tests are given at certain times, so you have to keep up with it, but it still takes less time than in a normal lecture class.

Another friend of mine is completely taking her courses online while being a stay at home mom and she likes it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
I've taken about 12 online courses. Not through these online schools, but through a real brick & mortor school (SUNY) that offers online classes. I would suggest looking for local colleges/universities that offer this. Most do nowadays. And you can be sure they are accredited and can offer/accept federal grants as payment.

By the way, I have HATED every online class I have taken. There's tons of busywork to make up for the lack of sitting at a desk/classtime interaction which I think is a load of bull. I'm currently taking what I hope will be my last online class EVER.
I second this post. I also go through a SUNY school for my college online courses.

I myself LOVE online classes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
503 Posts
I'm getting my Master's in Adult and Higher Education entirely online through the University of South Dakota. The degree will be the entirely the same as one earned brick and mortar.

Much of it is much harder, as the discipline required is much keener; no one is pushing me. I love the asynchronous learning though -- meaning I do my work whenever I feel like it. I am not the healthiest person and I have chronic insomnia, so the program is awesome for me. The biggest problem is that some courses are "taught" by professors who literally do no more than throw work out there and make you figure everything out yourself: I just completed a Master's level course in statistics literally on my own, and I haven't had any math courses since 1980!!! (P.S. -- got an A!)

One difference with me, I should say, is that universities are usually more flexible with grad students -- my profs have given me a few extensions that greatly relieved schedule conflicts induced by my migraines (and by the fact that I teach at a local community college).

I actually am specializing in online and distance ed, so if there's anything in particular I can answer for you, please let me know. I plan on teaching on line -- maybe even for the U of Phoenix! -- once I finish my degree this fall. (I'm so excited!!)

Blessings,
Mary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
503 Posts
I'm getting my Master's in Adult and Higher Education entirely online through the University of South Dakota. The degree will be the entirely the same as one earned brick and mortar.

Much of it is much harder, as the discipline required is much keener; no one is pushing me. I love the asynchronous learning though -- meaning I do my work whenever I feel like it. I am not the healthiest person and I have chronic insomnia, so the program is awesome for me. The biggest problem is that some courses are "taught" by professors who literally do no more than throw work out there and make you figure everything out yourself: I just completed a Master's level course in statistics literally on my own, and I haven't had any math courses since 1980!!! (P.S. -- got an A!)

One difference with me, I should say, is that universities are usually more flexible with grad students -- my profs have given me a few extensions that greatly relieved schedule conflicts induced by my migraines (and by the fact that I teach at a local community college).

I actually am specializing in online and distance ed, so if there's anything in particular I can answer for you, please let me know. I plan on teaching on line -- maybe even for the U of Phoenix! -- once I finish my degree this fall. (I'm so excited!!)

Blessings,
Mary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
616 Posts
When I was in University I took online courses whenever I could. I loved them! I liked working through things on my own. For some of the courses I had to go into the university and write the exams.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
615 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thank you everyone for all of your input. It helps to come here to FV with any kind of questions because I know that everyone will help out. Mary thank you for your offer in helping me through the courses. The only challenge that I have now is trying to figure out what I want to do. I was thinking some Business Courses because right now I have my own business and this will help me out some more. Once again thank you for all of your help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,746 Posts
Accreditation is the significant factor in most employers recognition of degrees. They cannot necessarily tell whether you did a course on-line or not, but they can tell whether the school is accredited - which means that it has been evaluated by an independent review board.

WRT taking the course - be careful to schedule your time and commit yourself to doing the reading and/or assignments. I have taught college classes and whether in live class or on-line, the problem most students run into is not making time to do the work - basically figure an average of about 3 hours per week for each credit hour the course earns if the course is covered in a normal 15-16 week semester. If you read slowly, count on more time. Also, find out if there are any supports that you think you might need - like on-line tutoring. And feel free to ask me for help, I've done a lot of free tutoring for people, both live and from a distance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,935 Posts
I've taken about 12 online courses. Not through these online schools, but through a real brick & mortor school (SUNY) that offers online classes. I would suggest looking for local colleges/universities that offer this. Most do nowadays. And you can be sure they are accredited and can offer/accept federal grants as payment.

By the way, I have HATED every online class I have taken. There's tons of busywork to make up for the lack of sitting at a desk/classtime interaction which I think is a load of bull. I'm currently taking what I hope will be my last online class EVER.
Can you define 'busywork' for me please? Is that like reading, assignments etc? I was looking into online courses last year but finances werent cooperating with me. Once I get the house tidied up a bit more, I'll be ready to plunge right in for summer courses.
 

·
Technical Support Sleuth
Joined
·
6,481 Posts
I'll give you an example of my classes. They last about 5 weeks at u of p.

Each class has discussion questions due each week, usually 2 or 3, some have a weekly summary due as well. Usually, there is one big individual assignment a week, in addition to a team project. There's also reading.

I have taken 8 or 9 classes now and I've been able to pass everyone without opening my online book.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top