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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I impulse shopped on Saturday and bought a 30 quart All American pressure canner. I was so excited to cut my canning time in half by processing 14 quarts at a time. That is until it arrived today and I saw the big bold letters on the top of the box - DO NOT USE ON A CERAMIC OR FLAT TOP STOVE. Apparently I was too busy drooling and missed this “little” detail.

Can I use a hot plate to can on? Or do I need to buy an old coil stove? If I buy an old coil stove I will have to put wiring in the basement so I can can down there as there is no room for a second stove in the kitchen. I am also a little worried about the stability of using a hot plate. Any suggestions?
 

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Yeah, NO CANNING ON A GLASS TOP STOVE.

You can use a propane camp stove, a propane counter top burner (caterers use these - they are very nice) or a good quality electric coil stove. Many people find it an advantage to be able to can in a room other than the kitchen in order to not heat up the whole house during the hot, dog days of summer. Eventually installing an inexpensive electric or propane stove in a workshop or shed may be your answer.

But this begs the question ... do you mean you were using a smaller pressure canner on your glass top stove? The problem is the stove usually don't maintain even heat or the canner can get so hot (under pressure = high heat) that the glass top can break. If you were canning with a smaller canner, I take it you weren't having either of these problems. Were you able to maintain an even temperature?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
But this begs the question ... do you mean you were using a smaller pressure canner on your glass top stove? The problem is the stove usually don't maintain even heat or the canner can get so hot (under pressure = high heat) that the glass top can break. If you were canning with a smaller canner, I take it you weren't having either of these problems. Were you able to maintain an even temperature?
Um.....yes I was canning on a glass top stove. :thud: I don't recall reading that I couldn't when I bought my smaller one. I have been canning this way for over 2 years now and I have not have any issues that I know of. I need the canner to be at 13# but at 15# it starts to make a slow rhythmic sound. So I set the canner to 15# and listen to it while doing other things. Once I turn the stove down and the temperature adjusts I never have to touch the again - It holds a perfect 15#. It has been wonderful!

Vigilant
Thank you for the link! I will check it out.

Russ
Thanks! My fiance has one....maybe I can "borrow" it. :whistle: What's his will soon be mine - right? LOL!
 

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Hmm...I use my small pressure canner on a glass topped stove. I think it depends on the stove. My stove instructions tell me I can use it for that. Hmm...
 

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I have no idea if this will work but for a problem my Mom has of a large canner on a smaller base, she uses a cooling rack. She puts it over the burner and sets the canner on top. It provides a bit more space for the heat to start circulating. Prevents the burner from overheating and melting the coils. Has worked just fine for her. Maybe something like that could work for this canner.
 

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Look around for a decent used gas stove to put in your basement. You can use your canner on that, and also use it in the case of a power outage for regular food prep. Be aware that you can't use the oven if the stove has an electronic ignition and there's a power outage, but you can light the burners with a match and use those.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the help and ideas. You have given us a lot to research, think about and investigate to decide what option is best.
 
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