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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was given 2 boxes of glass top canning jars...they have the orange rubber seal and the metal that is around and ontop of the jar...
Does anyone know how to use these?
I wanted to make a small batch of spaghetti sauce today....
My sisterinlaw got me them from a tag sale....
 

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They are probably no longer safe to use for canning..... I have a bunch of them too, and because of their age, there are tiny nicks and cracks - some of which you cannot even see- all around the rim from use. PLUS the rubber rings are not reusable, and the only source I knew of for them was in Canada.
HOWEVER - they are nice for dried soup mixes and general storage. I have a friend who paints rural scenes on them and sells them at craft fairs. They are also decorative filled with marbles, pinecones etc.
You might not be able to use them for canning, but I bet you could make some unique Christmas gifts with them! :)
 
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This summer I been selling off extra canning jars. One thing I have learned is that the wire bail jars for canning are still alive and well.
We can still buy local the rubbers for them. One farm store still gets canning supplies in weekly they tell me.
One lady bought them from me to use because her daughter has breast cancer and she has done research and decided not to use the standard screw on collars with flat lids because of the BPA supposedly in them.
Another lady bought over 10 dz wire bails from me, because of the BPA issue also. She has a friend who wants 10-12 dz. I have found some for this order, but have not heard back yet for the friend.

If I had to use them, I certainly would. I used to when my kids were growing up. I had approximately 1000 jars of all shapes and sizes.

One thing people who are worried about the BPA are using Tattler lids. Way too expensive for me, but certainly a option.

I would not use the blue ones btw. They have more antique and decorating value.
 
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I agree with the other posters I would use to store grains and dry goods but not canning . You never know with these things but here is the information on them.

These jars are not recommended by the USDA. The only home canning method endorsed by the USDA is the one that involves Ball/Kerr/Mason jars and the two-part lids. Thing is, Weck jars aren’t endorsed either and they are widely sold today and are an extremely popular style of canning jar in Europe. These vintage bailing wire jars are the functional equivalent of the Weck jars. That fact leads me to extrapolate that if you treat the vintage jars with the same safety precautions that are recommended for the Weck jars (those safety precautions come from the Weck company, not from the USDA) and check the seal after canning by lifting the jar by the lid, your canned item might be just fine. If you have to use them, an added precaution, I would only plan on using these vintage jars to can high sugar items like jams and jellies. Even then you should probably just use for dry goods but wanted to give you info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
This summer I been selling off extra canning jars. One thing I have learned is that the wire bail jars for canning are still alive and well.
We can still buy local the rubbers for them. One farm store still gets canning supplies in weekly they tell me.
One lady bought them from me to use because her daughter has breast cancer and she has done research and decided not to use the standard screw on collars with flat lids because of the BPA supposedly in them.
Another lady bought over 10 dz wire bails from me, because of the BPA issue also. She has a friend who wants 10-12 dz. I have found some for this order, but have not heard back yet for the friend.

If I had to use them, I certainly would. I used to when my kids were growing up. I had approximately 1000 jars of all shapes and sizes.

One thing people who are worried about the BPA are using Tattler lids. Way too expensive for me, but certainly a option.

I would not use the blue ones btw. They have more antique and decorating value.
awesome! I did use one...wanted to try it first before diving into a full batch.:)
 

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Using old wire bail type jars

You certainly can use them for hot water bath canning. I've successfully canned tomatoes, salsa, tomato sauce (no meat or mushrooms added,) and fruits such as peaches and pears in them. I haven't managed to kill anyone yet! I would not, however, attempt to pressure can using them. Glass ages the same as anything else, and it would defeat the purpose of trying to save a few bucks on the food bill to open the canner to find it full of food and glass shards.

I inherited about two hundred such jars from my late mother-in-law. I do a lot of canning, and having these available for the acid foods freed up some newer jars in my inventory for using for pressure canning.

The biggest issue is to check them very carefully for nicks and scratches in the glass. Then you get the jar rubbers (if you have an old fashioned hardware store, so much the better, but I know they are available at Lehman's. At Lehman's prices----grrr!)

Make sure that you use the hot pack method with these jars. Fill them as per the directions in the Ball canning book. Wipe the rim of the jar with a cloth dipped in vinegar, center the rubber ring on the rim of the jar, place the glass lid on the ring so that the notch in the top is parallel to the wire bail, and close the bails. Process in boiling water deep enough to cover the jars by an inch or so. At the end of the processing time remove the jars using the basket rack or a jar lifter and set them on a dishcloth at least one inch apart from each other. Leave them alone for at least twelve hours.

You should have to pull on the ring to release the vacuum in the jar after you flip the wire bail open when you are planning to use the food. If the jar lid can be lifted off easily, the seal has failed. Boil the food for ten minutes before throwing it out in the garbage where people and animals can't get to it, and it is a good idea to wear rubber gloves while you are handling the trash. I'd retire any jar that fails to seal to non-canning storage or decorative uses. I made some bath salts one year by adding a little olive oil to a mixture of epsom salts and sea salt, added a tiny bit of blue food coloring to the mixture, and some essential oil (lavender.) Just mixed it in the jars that way. This cleared out some of my inventory of non-cannable jars, and made delightful little holiday gifts for the ladies in my office.

Yes, you can reuse the rubber rings until they are shot. After opening the jar, wash and dry the ring and store it flat in a box. When canning season comes around again, test each ring by folding it in half. If you see any cracks at the fold, throw the ring away (or use it for crafts or something like that.) It isn't suitable for canning anymore at that point.
 

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I also heard that the colored ones are worth $. Check out eBay. You may reconsider using them. Personally, I wouldn't chance using them for long-term storage of liquid items. Dry items maybe.
 

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Hi all,

I use the glass top jars all the time. They are a beautiful way to store things, even the blue ones which CAN have more value. Google "Mason Jar Value" to see what yours are worth.
I like to put up peaches & fruit cocktail because it looks so nice. Tomato sauce I make in quantity and use the newer 2 piece lid jars. Just preference.
The rubber gaskets are readily avaiable at TruValue hardware stores. If you have a good neighborhood store, they can order them if they don't already stock them. Be sure you order the right ones. There are standard and wide mouth, just like the new jars. The are a bit expensive but YES, you can reuse they (CAREFULLY) and the big saving is in the canning and increased quality of your food.
As for those who suggest you can't use these, remeber, these jars were used for YEARS with little or no incident of spoilage when they were introduced and for many years after. Are the new ones easier? Yeah, a bit. But I do not believe they are any safer...except when you try to remove the lid! That is one thing I have STILL not figure out how to do easily! LOL...

Mark
 
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