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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My dd14 is starting to research for her career. She has said lawyer or teacher. Once she found out the length of time and expense of lawyer, she decided against it for now. As a family with 4 kids, she knows her help has limits. Then teacher came along. It is something that she has talked about for a long time. But there are more and more cut backs to education every year, I know MANY MANY education graduates that aren't working. Their starting wage after 4 years education is barely above minimum wage. So we aren't really feeling so good about her doing this.

We looked at dental hygienist, but with the private schools that started, there is a surplus of hygienists and work is harder to find. I'd say with the boomers retiring, there would be more, but the median age of the hygienists is under 30.

Dh says nursing, there is a HIGH demand for them here, it pays very well, it is very flexible too, but she is very very squeamish and doesn't want that.

I've been saying trades, she's thick skinned, could handle working in male dominated workplace, and she could use that to pay her way through Law school if she still wanted to do so, since lawschool doesn't want 18yo in the program anyway, they want them to have some life experience and other education.(know a plumber turned lawyer, who got through debt free). She could take some courses in the evenings prior to applying and have some credits.

Dh doesn't know if she could do it, she doesn't know tools, etc. I looked at him... you've never had her help you so you could show her. We did strip a parts car after takign the motor, she LOVED getting in there, so I don't see how she couldn't enjoy it at least a little. He said, yes, but it's repetitive and boring... yet, ds is doing it, he is, my dad, his dad, my brother, his brother.... why can't she?

Any other suggestions that might be suitable for a female? We're looking at a wide range, something where she can make a decent wage and support herself decently.

I'm trying to think outside the box....
 

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ODS has choosen to go into nursing, but he has a lot of personal experience and it called to him.

How does she feel about becoming a chef or cook? Are those areas of interest?

I'm a lawyer and I don't recommend it unless you really love law. It's just too much work if you don't enjoy it to begin with.

I think if she liked taking apart the car then there's nothing wrong with that as a field. Can any of your other relatives help her get more comfortable around the tools as well?
 

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If she does decide to go to ANY college, for ANY job, there are always the core classes she will need to get out of the way. So while I think she should continue to think about what direction she wants to go, she does have a little more time.
 

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What about a vocational high school. I think with the economy the way it is, it is a great option. you can learn a trade while in high school while still being able to go to college after. My dd's friend did that and became a hair stylist. She now attends college for something different but at least she has a trade and can make good money working part time while going to school. And it didn't cost her anything to attend. Still able to get into a great college. My friends son also attended a vocational and got a certificate in building maintainance. He is off to a trade school but has lots of various experience from electrical to carpentry and plumbing. They do one week of academics and one week of shop. They have to maintain good grades in order to stay in the program. The schools also do not have to put up with a lot of the discipline problems because if they do not work up to standards they are kicked out.

The vocational school in my area has wonderful programs. They also have the kids take a week in each field to decide what they want to pursue. I worked in a nursing home and they had a nurses aides program that allowed them to go right into their LPN right after graduation.

I went to a vocational school for LPN years ago and I always wished I had gone on to get my RN but it was a great career for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
ODS has choosen to go into nursing, but he has a lot of personal experience and it called to him.

How does she feel about becoming a chef or cook? Are those areas of interest?

I'm a lawyer and I don't recommend it unless you really love law. It's just too much work if you don't enjoy it to begin with.

I think if she liked taking apart the car then there's nothing wrong with that as a field. Can any of your other relatives help her get more comfortable around the tools as well?
Hairstylists here get barely above minimum wage for years :( while it's something you could do on the side, it's not a very well paying job here. Same with cooks, that is peanuts for pay. untrained laborers make more.

If she does decide to go to ANY college, for ANY job, there are always the core classes she will need to get out of the way. So while I think she should continue to think about what direction she wants to go, she does have a little more time.
Russ, we have a few issues with our post secondary schools here, they aren't necessarily transferrable. So I hesitate to take any classes until we know her direction at all. I know, it's 'stupid', but the schools are being proprietary, and not acknowledging courses from other schools. I personally think it's a money grab. Many families have found that out the hard way.



What about a vocational high school. I think with the economy the way it is, it is a great option. you can learn a trade while in high school while still being able to go to college after. My dd's friend did that and became a hair stylist. She now attends college for something different but at least she has a trade and can make good money working part time while going to school. And it didn't cost her anything to attend. Still able to get into a great college. My friends son also attended a vocational and got a certificate in building maintenance. He is off to a trade school but has lots of various experience from electrical to carpentry and plumbing. They do one week of academics and one week of shop. They have to maintain good grades in order to stay in the program. The schools also do not have to put up with a lot of the discipline problems because if they do not work up to standards they are kicked out.

The vocational school in my area has wonderful programs. They also have the kids take a week in each field to decide what they want to pursue. I worked in a nursing home and they had a nurses aides program that allowed them to go right into their LPN right after graduation.

I went to a vocational school for LPN years ago and I always wished I had gone on to get my RN but it was a great career for me.
We don't have those here. But we have a RAP program in the high school she is going to. RAP is a register Apprenticeship program. Starting in grade 11, the student can work one semester, do school one semester. the students can take 1 extra year to complete their high school. My ds has done this, but will not be requiring an extra year, as he has take a couple correspondence classes to make up the difference. By the time he graduates this spring, he is ready for his first year apprentice schooling. He got his apprentice indenture-ship within 3 weeks of working, through this program, where MOST people not through the program must work a year with a company before they'll indenture them. So this gives him nearly a 2 year head start in his trade. He'll be a 2nd year apprentice next fall at 18yo, wage will be approx $25/hr then.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What about Paralegal? I am a Paralegal and I have a Bachelor in Paralegal Studies. I work for an attorney and do a lot of the work.
Thanks for the reminder! I forgot about that, and court reporting. That is something she may be interested in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
We'd never send her away for school or work. She wouldn't want to either. We're a tight knit unit.

Plus the cost of education in the US is way higher. The return on education, IMO isn't that great, once you consider she can't stay home so there is that much more cost to her education.
 

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I'd also recommend trades. There are many other trades besides automechanic and hairstylist. I spend a large portion of my time at work as an instructor for our in-house electrical training schools. We are see more and more women come into the field. We teach Power Electricians, many provinces and states don't list it as a specific trade, but rather a certificate on top of Industrial or Construction Electricians. Power Electricians basically install, repair, maintain and calibrate all of the equipment involve in electrical generation and transmission. We work in the big power houses, in the big substations, and on the equipment you see hanging off the hydro lines.

I entered into the program directly out of high school with very little background in tools, and was able learn pretty quickly. Our field prefers to hire people "green", so they aren't bringing in bad habits, I think a lot of fields are the same, so lack of experience should be a deterrent.

Just thought I'd throw in another vote for trades. The world needs more people who can do things with their hands, and most trades are so short-staffed it isn't even funny. Pay and benefits are very attractive as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'd also recommend trades. There are many other trades besides automechanic and hairstylist. I spend a large portion of my time at work as an instructor for our in-house electrical training schools. We are see more and more women come into the field. We teach Power Electricians, many provinces and states don't list it as a specific trade, but rather a certificate on top of Industrial or Construction Electricians. Power Electricians basically install, repair, maintain and calibrate all of the equipment involve in electrical generation and transmission. We work in the big power houses, in the big substations, and on the equipment you see hanging off the hydro lines.

I entered into the program directly out of high school with very little background in tools, and was able learn pretty quickly. Our field prefers to hire people "green", so they aren't bringing in bad habits, I think a lot of fields are the same, so lack of experience should be a deterrent.

Just thought I'd throw in another vote for trades. The world needs more people who can do things with their hands, and most trades are so short-staffed it isn't even funny. Pay and benefits are very attractive as well.
I am looking at going into trades myself once the youngest(grade 3) enters jr. high. So I can't see why she couldn't either. She's bigger than I, stronger so it's just a matter of applying herself. Teacher would max out at about $45K for YEARS if she could get a job at all. Then there is all the bureaucracy involved, i know many teachers wanting to leave the field, but have nothing to fall back on to make the move. They earn enough to live, but not get ahead.
 

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I highly discourage law school unless it is her dream. Attorney jobs are scarce in the US as the market is flooded- trust me- my husband is an attorney and we've spent the entire time since he graduated dealing with a bad job market. Ugh. If she wants to do law have her do paralegal instead.
 

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I would encourage your daughter to take a test (questionnaire) to see what she is suited for. The high school guidance counselor should know of this test. Basically asks you questions and when you get the results back will give you an idea of the types of careers that you are suited for.

Working a job that you have no desire to do is very stressful. Having a job that you enjoy is hard to find but makes life so much better even if the pay is not that good.

Know someone who was told that by parents that they needed a college degrees. After they get the degree they can do and be whatever they wanted. Really, in the long run you do need a degree now a days. If her interest in law I would have her speak to people in the field. Maybe she can start in some type of legal field and if she is still interested then study to be a lawyer.

There are many alternatives out there for education. She may also want to look into being a Vista volunteer to help with her education bills.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
We don't have a Vista program from what I can see, it must be a US program.

We'll do those tests, but she is SO much like me, it'll come out "You can do pretty much whatever you want". I redid mine so many times, different tests and it was always inconclusive..lol
 

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Has she considered accounting or business? My son just finished his MBA and had a job before he even finished. With business courses and accounting courses there are many options for jobs.
 

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I remember seeing a chart once that showed what careers could come out of which majors. I think that made it easier for me to choose to study history because I realized that I could do more than just go right back in to teaching history. I modified my history study to Family History/Genealogy (this was at BYU the LDS owned college and the LDS believe strongly in doing family history). Both of those majors had things like archivist, librarian (may have to get an MLS), title search and other historical research companies.

See if you can find a chart that goes into it like that. Even Mathematics, that my husband majored in, has far more applications than I ever thought. Everything from national security - encryption, etc., to computer programming - especially 3D graphics programming, to accounting.

I would contact a school counselor if possible, take tests, and just start searching the internet "What careers use _____?"

How about some of the higher skilled trades like CAD and drafting? Or CNC (mill and lathe work - computer assisted) or lowlevel programming like embedded software programming - someone's got to program the actual chip that is inside a phone or computer.

Are there ITT Tech type schools? Or Applied Technology Centers? They often teach those types of things like a trade school.
 

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there are certain jobs / careers that are more than a job but a life choice -

as much as there is supposed to be high demand for nurses i hear of alot who when they graduate cant get a job because no experience

and honestly unless one feels a calling in their heart - dont do it - i can pick out a nurse who went into it for job security as main reason in 10 minutes of watching them work - no matter how hard a worker - theres just something missing .

i feel bad kids are feeling like they need to know exactly what they want to do so early . its too much pressure IMO if one has lways had a certain calling or talent thats fine . but society is putting too much pressure on them -


my 17 is highly intelligent but isnt sure what he wants to do so has decided to do county college basics for 2 years when he graduates and then go with what he decides . family members are all up in arms because he could go to "better colleges" on i am sure some scholarship money - but why when what is left to pay will still be more than county - and if NJ continues the starz program he will only have to pay for his books for the 2 years there .

i am a huge believer in do what you love and you will find sucess

now if what you love has no jobs options with a secure future and can be done as a hobby - do something that works with your strengths and do that as a hobby and one day when money is not an issue one can do their hobby as a job

oldest son had interests in astronomy - but because of limited jobs in this area didnt do it despite a special program in a college near us - he is very smart in math he did accounting - now has a fT job and can do it as his hobby without worrying about bills
 

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She is still quite young. Her tastes and interests are going to change. As far as teaching goes, that was my job before I met my husband and moved to the States. I don't know where you are located but they make an awesome living.....I was in Ontario. I made over double what the teachers make here in the States with an unbelievable retirement package.

Paralegal would be a good choice if she is that interested in law. Has she seen a guidance counsellor at school? They really do have the tools to help students decide what direction they should go they also have many resources that your DD could utilize and help her decide. Whatever happens, I hope she doesn't make a snap decision. It does sound like you have raised an intelligent daughter! :)
 

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I really think that if she truly wants to be a teacher, you need to support that decision. You say that she has talked about it for a "long time." Teachers can earn a living and if she is passionate about it, then that is what matters!!

I wanted to be a social worker when I was her age, and all through high school, but my mother discouraged me from it and kept reminding me that even with a masters degree I'll never earn a lot of money. Well, I know several social workers who make more than me, and they love their jobs. I'm not sure if that's the path I should have taken, but the point is that you do need to step back and let her pursue her own dreams!
 
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