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This just came out and I find it very interesting. It was a report on Canadian children, but I'm sure you'd find the same for American children as well. Kinda scary and one main reason to learn to eat healthy.

A report just out identifies Canadian children as ‘Generation H’, the H being for heart attack! This is an alarming trend as our children are developing major risk factors for heart disease at such a young age. In 1999, 37% of children between the ages of 2-11were overweight and 18% were obese. Children must change their lifestyle or one day join the 80,000 Canadians who die every year from cardiovascular diseases.
 

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Wow!
Yes from what I see among our children, this would also be a safe bet down here.
Unfortunately, the focus here seems on being placing the blame, not fixing the problem!
 

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I'm not surprised with so many processed convenience foods and fast foods and kids plopping themselves down and not getting outside to play etc.
 

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I was just informed that for the next month I am only to make Lo Mein, with various bits of meat!
I love oriental cooking, and am experimenting with Thai food. DH loves it, says my lo mein is better than the best place in town's!
 

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Sis, sounds good!!

I think Sara has a great point here though. It isn't just about the food our kids are eating, although a lot of food is junk food. Its about sitting around, in front of the computer, tv or Nitendo and not getting outside and excersising.

When we were in the city, driving down most streets, you seldom seen kids outside playing. We use to comment, our street was the only street with kids outside. Living in the country hasn't changed that much either. There are seldom kids playing outside, riding their bikes or having fun the way kids use to do. Its not just our small town (where there aren't many kids), but most small towns that we've driven around in.

I think it comes down to adults setting an example. If were sitting in front of the computer, watching tv or not excersising, were not setting very good examples for our kids, kwim.

Even our schools have slowed down in the phys-ed departments. Money is short, so cut backs are hitting that area (along with other areas) the most.


One of the best things that happened to us when we moved to the country, was there are no fast food restaurants around for miles. Although my kids always loved veggies/fruits, we were notorious for going to fast food places when we lived in the city, especially in the summer when it was 95 degrees out and the humidity was at 100%. We can't do that now!!!
 

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Last week our local community along with other various communities hosted a kick off for a walking program. A friend and I attended, and one of the most alarming things the speakers had to say was that children are at high risk for developing heart disease. In our community a Health group comes to each elementary school and does a wellness test on the 5th grade students. Last year, they were able to help a 5th grade student find out that his cholesterol level was above 400 (normal for adults is under 200). Because of this group, his parents were able to have him tested by their local physician. As it turned out, they had 2 younger children, and they also had high levels of cholesterol. The parents were able to get the children's levels under control with the help of their family physician. Needless to say, these parents were extremely grateful to this Health group.

The speakers went on to say that children and adults are too sedentary and are not eating properly. This program kick off was to promote walking as an exercise that the whole family could enjoy.

It is scary that most of us don't get enough exercise or eat properly. I know that I have been making an extreme effort here to feed my family healthy meals and to walk, etc. I agree with the rest of you, though, that it is too easy to just get convenience food and that is part of the health problems we have nowadays. This is one reason I am thankful for this web site, as it helps us all stay on track and keep motivated.

yolo
 

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MJsLady said:
I was just informed that for the next month I am only to make Lo Mein, with various bits of meat!
I love oriental cooking, and am experimenting with Thai food. DH loves it, says my lo mein is better than the best place in town's!
Mel, can I have your recipe, pretty please?
~
I think one of the keys is to start them out young in various activities (ie:swimming ,baseball,hiking etc. in summer~
x-skiing ,snowshoeing,skating etc. in winter.)and be an example.
With all the variety they think exercise = fun .
Just move:fdance:
 

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Darlene, my lo mein is very simple. Firt start water for pasta boiling. I use plain spaghetti noodles for the lo mein Start heating 6 tbs of oil (I use canola but real Thai food uses peanut) slice up carrots (they take longest to cook) Drop them in the oil, while they cook slice up your meat, very thin, add it. While it starts cooking I slice celery,(cutting the celery on a slant cuts those annoying threads it has!)and onion. I add soy sauce and spices. The neat thing with Thai cooking is, you don't measure! You cook by taste. I like mine fairly spicy, until I get some Thai spices, I use lots of red pepper, garlic and onion powder. I do not cook with salt. I do put a touch of it in my pasta water. Cook pasta as normal, then drain and add to the frying meat and veggies, mix it and let it fry together. Stir it a little to keep it from sticking! Dinner yesterday took about 20 mins cook time! Usually I cut the veggies ahead of time, and the meat, so I can just pop it in the wok and go!
Hope you enjoy it!
 
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