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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I myself was homeschooled on and off and I believe in it completely and plan on homeschooling my two children when the times comes.
Does anyone here have any experience homeschooling a child with severe disabilities( home bound, tube fed, severe Cp,mental retadation and much more). I can't imagine sending him to public school so that isn't even an option to me. He needs 24-7 one on one care and he can get that here at home!:tay:
 

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I used to be a nurse at a state facility for the mentally retarded. One of the best things I ever used was flash cards. I'm not sure of your child's functional level and what he already knows. With your child's condition(s) it can vary greatly, as I'm sure you already know. I did see the non-verbal part. I had many clients that were nonverbal. I simply watched for other cues such as eye movement, nodding, etc. Does your child participate in any type of therapy (speech, occupational, etc)?

Stephanie
 

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I homeschool my 'typically developing' children, but I'm also a nurse who has worked with kids like your child.

I think homeschooling would be a great idea, because you know him best. I would be a wee bit leary of one thing. I think because of his disability, I think powers that be will watch you a bit more closely than usual.

Here are the basics of hs'ing in Missouri: http://www.hslda.org/laws/default.asp?State=MO Looks like a fairly 'easy' state in which to homeschool.

A couple of other considerations:
1. In public school, he would get lots of therapy services for free (speech & occupational therapies, at minimum).
2. You may or may not be able to get those same services through the school system while you homeschool.
3. What about you? Do you have a good support system for respite?
 

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I am a sibling of a severely disabled child. He would have turned 50 last month.
When he was born in the late 1950's, it was suggested that he be institutionalized with other kids like him. That was just what was done. My parents would have no part of that. We (as a family) provided for all of his daily needs... he was fed, bathed, diapered, dressed, entertained, etc. There was no such thing as disposable diapers back then. It was only closer to the late 70's and early 80's that disposable adult size diapers were available for a small fortune. For 25 years my mom (bless her heart) washed cloth diapers in a Maytag wringer washer. As he grew older, she made most of the diapers herself out of old baby receiving blankets, towels, flannel sheets because baby diapers were too small and the premade adult diapers also cost a small fortune.
It was only until he turned 19 years old and he could no longer be covered by my dad's medical insurance through work were "doors of opportunity" (for lack of a better word) opened. Suddenly he was eligible for month cash and food assistance, education, respite care, etc. In many, many ways it was a God-send to our family. Though she never would have admitted it, I know that it gave my mom a lot more freedom during the day for herself and for appointments and errands. She could even go to lunch if she wanted, alone, without having to worrry about him.
As far as educating him, he functioned at a 6-month-old level so he was never be able to speak, read or write. But he did get socialization with other people, students and staff. He was a people person, the more attention he could get the happier he was. He loved the 1-1/2 hour bus ride a.m. and p.m. since he loved riding in the car. He got therapy with music and singing and he was in seventh heaven.
In my opinion, though, sometimes it got to be more of a hindrance than good. The teachers thought they were miracle workers and through their efforts, suddenly a severely impaired student would **poof** become Einstein. What was the benefit to my brother to teach a blind, severely impaired child to manipulate his wheelchair? Sure he could operate his wheelchair -- WOW -- but he had no fear or understanding of danger of where he was going in his wheelchair as he headed for a flight of stairs, the street, the hot stove.
As I see it, your child will benefit from public schools such as 1) free physical and occupational therapy; 2) networking with other parents. This will also allow you some free time during the day for yourself, to work, run errands, etc. And as Valerie said above, your state might not give you the 'choice' of public schooling and home schooling. Seems unfair that they feel they can 'play God' and dictate what's best for your child, but they can if they choose to do so.
My prayers and best wishes go out to you and your son. Just know that if you ever want to talk, vent, etc. I'll help out any way I can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the info gals! Just found this posting back today. I had a meeting with the school system and they agreed that he would either have to go to a school for the severely handicapped an hr away( hr each way) or recieve his therapies at home which will still be provided simply based on the amount of care he needs while at school since they don't seem to be able to adequately care for his needs. At 3( soon) he transfers from Early Intervention to the school system. He will definitly be getting all of his services at home still. At school age(6ish I assume) I will most likely for many reasons to chose to keep him at home but if I say the reasoning behind that is that I want to homeschool him then he simply won't get any services at all. So the reason will be because of the extent of his disabilities and the fact that if he gets sick we'll be in the hospital for months. He just can't be around that many people. So I think I have things worked out. Thanks!
 
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