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~I checked the NADA guide for the year/model and got this result: $3,250 list price, $540 low retail, $650 average retail. They say on the site that the list price means the price when brand new.
I also searched all over the country for this particular model for sale and have found sale and list prices anywhere from $1100-3000 depending on region and condition I suppose. Obviously these figures are much higher than the NADA claims is the value. Why is that?
We're going to look at the trailer this weekend and I have a checklist of things to look for(another online find since we're new at this). The condition looks very good in the pictures.
Assuming it is in very good condition, how much is it approximately worth or, even better, what is too much to offer?~
 

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I have a mini-camper, in the UK. It's now twelve years old and has averaged 12,000 miles a year. Recently, it was involved in a shunt - someone ran in to the rear of it, while I was stationary at a junction. The insurance assessor took one look at the age and the odometer and was about to write it off - until he checked a few on-line adverts for other vehicles (same model, same year) and discovered that despite everything, most campers, if properly maintained, retain their resale value very well. Some models better than others, obviously. Mine was rebuilt at the cost to the third party (idiot who ran into me).

The best way to find out what the average resale price for the model you're interested in would be to look at the press/on-line private sales market. What is the average price? How much does it vary, with regard to the mileage on the odometer? Consider, once you find one you're REALLY interested in - knock 10% off the asking price, make that your offer and watch the seller's eyes. Obviously, you can't do this on-line!

Best of luck!
 
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We got our best deal on a camper by buying one that had been previously owned by the state and used in a state park. It was very well maintained and less expensive. Since you are in CO, you could check out that as a possibility?

As far as value, I'd consider the high number to be a pristine version, the low to be a fixer upper, and would need to see the actual camper in question in person to decide where it feel price-wise between the two. Do you have a list of items to check out when looking at a particular model? Signs of water leakage, gray water tanks in good shape, tires good, etc?
 

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From what I can tell....they are worth whatever someone is willing to pay. I have a friend who refurbishes and resells motoerhomes on Ebay. She specializes in a particular type. Prices are all over the place...depending on demand at the time. Some areas of the country the prices are higher. Like arrid areas where there is bound to be less water/weather damage.
 

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When we bought our used Class C late last year, asking prices were right around NADA low retail, and that was true even of units in excellent condition and those offered by both dealers and private parties. NADA is supposed to account for your geographic location, so I'm not sure why you're seeing big discrepancies in NADA vs. asking prices.

If it were me, I'd a rate the unit's condition as high, average, or low after seeing it, and then offer the corresponding NADA price on it. Maybe the seller can explain why they're asking so much more than NADA value. There might be a good reason (extra features, or simply a hot market right now.) Around here, both sellers and buyers usually have the NADA printout in hand, so there's not a lot of haggling.

You may already be aware of this, but be sure to check the date codes on all of the tires. If they're more than 5ish years old, they'll need to be replaced, regardless of how much tread is left or how few miles they were used. That can be a big expense, depending on how many/what type. We got burned on that on a different Class C....we ended up having to put on new tires to the tune of $1000 (and those were the cheap ones) because we didn't learn about the date code thing until after we bought. Expensive mistake, so now I warn everyone I know who's RV shopping! I know trailer tires are cheaper, but if they need to be replaced, it's definitely something to factor into your offer price.

Good luck!
 

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~Thanks for the replies. I was afraid it was once of those "it's worth whatever someone wants to pay for it" kind of deals. I like to a know value range on used items so I feel like it's a fair deal for both parties so this is really confusing to me. :/
We're looking at a pop-up camper, very basic and tiny, since we're completely new to owning a camper and because we only have a mini-van to pull anything with. Our Caravan is rated at twice the hauling capacity of the trailer.
Thia is the checklist I will print and take with us when we go: Buy Used ~
 

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We're looking at a pop-up camper, very basic and tiny, since we're completely new to owning a camper and because we only have a mini-van to pull anything with. Our Caravan is rated at twice the hauling capacity of the trailer.
Thia is the checklist I will print and take with us when we go: Buy Used ~
How lovely to read you're looking for something like I have - I'll send you to have a look at mine, which is exactly what we need BUT - sadly - not available in the USA. Just imagine the cost of importing one like this!

Motorhomes.Mobi | Used Romahome Hylo Citroen for sale

Best of luck in your search and your mini-camping.
 
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Very cool, Toffee!

We've loved all our pop-ups. We're on the third one, bought last spring. We REALLY love that one!

We're getting older and tireder and lazier, plus we've almost run out of destinations within a thousand miles of home, so we decided to bite the bullet and get something easier to set up because we're going to have to put in longer days on the road now to get anywhere new. The new trailer sets up in about thirty seconds.

Some of our online camping friends insist we should have bought something other than a pop up, but we often tow across the Dakotas. The last time we crossed North Dakota, we had forty mile per hour sustained cross winds. We watched dozens of taller trailers being blown all over the road, while our pop up just followed obediently behind us. There's no way to beat the low profile of a pop up. We like the coziness of them, too. We lose only one mile per gallon dragging our trailer, compared to a the average 25% drop in fuel economy with a taller trailer. Folding trailers simply don't have the same problem with drag that taller campers do. And, when we had our canvas pop ups, there was no way to beat how they folded up small and then opened into much larger living spaces.

Toffee, this is the type of trailer Nuisance is talking about, in case you're not familiar with our campers over here. This isn't her specific one, but would be similar.
2004 FLEETWOOD YUMA POPUP TOWABLE RV CAMPER IN BRAND NEW CONDITION in RVs & Campers | eBay Motors
 

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I never did answer the original question.

Yes, region and condition do affect prices, as does demand. Shopping in the fall or winter will often get you a lower price than in the spring and summer, when everyone wants to go camping. Prices tend to be higher west of the Rockies, due to shipping costs. A camper in good condition can easily sell above book value. Our first one did. We paid a premium for it ourselves, used it for five years, and then sold it for more than we paid for it. In a down economy, people still want to camp and travel but don't want to or can't pay to buy new, so more people are looking for a good deal on a used entry-level camper.

NADA and KBB (Kelly Blue Book) will give you the most accurate values, but their listings don't take into account regional demand. So if pop ups are in demand in your area, you may have to spend more than book value to get what you want in the condition you want.

It's impossible to give any opinion about the value of what you're looking at without knowing make, model, and year. :) It's like asking what a car is worth, when we don't know what kind of car.

When you look at the camper, be sure to crawl around under it, look under curtains and in cabinets for water stains, etc. If you see any water damage, even a little bit, you might want to pass on it because it's most likely worse where you can't see it. Sniff the camper and see if it smells like mildew. If it smells like wet wood, pass. Also, before deciding to hand over your money, have the seller set up the camper and take it down, or better yet, you do it under the seller's supervision and direction, so you understand what's involved. Pop ups aren't for everyone. I've known people who have bought one, used it once, and gotten rid of it because they didn't want to deal with the set up. Have the seller turn on every appliance and light. Don't be shy to open cabinet doors. Have your entire family sit in the dinette, lay on the beds (shoes off), and imagine what it would be like to be in there on a rainy day. Look in the cabinets and think about where your stuff would go. Cabinets fill up fast. Is there a space to set a cooler? Where will duffel bags go? Where will the Porta Potti go? Is there room for dishes, pots, dishpans?

Assume you will need new tires, and also assume the wheel bearings will need to be re-packed and the lift system will need to be lubed. Neither the wheel bearings nor the lifters are hard to lube if you're handy, and parts, if needed for the bearings, aren't that expensive and neither is the grease.

You may want a sway controller to help reduce sway and make for a safer ride. We paid around $100 for ours at a dealer. We had to have it on the spot and I'm sure we could have done better buying it elsewhere, but we didn't have any choice. If you can install it yourself, you'll save too. We had the first one installed by the dealer, again because we had no choice at that time, but we installed the sway bar on the new trailer ourselves.

It will cost some to outfit the new trailer unless you have tenting gear already, but it can be done over time secondhand, most of it anyway. I raided our closets and cabinets at home for a lot of our stuff, and picked up a lot of other stuff at garage sales. Dollar stores are also a great place to get camping gear. One time, I filled the entire back of our Chevy Blazer from the front seats to the tailgate, up to the ceiling, for $7. Gotta love church bag sales! Most of it was camping gear (we outfitted two campers that year.)
 

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Its kind of crazy but we bought a huge holiday rambler 2001 5th wheel model used for $9000 4 years ago. We financed 3 years from the credit union and paid it off really early. Then when we wanted to get out of a new truck buy we were upside down on dh sold it back to dealer and we had to take a $5000 loan from the same credit union to make up the difference.

We used the camper to get the loan so now I have a "loan" payment on the same camper to the same credit union that values the camper at $17,000!

Go figure?

It is a very nice camper lol!

I'll be paying it off early again. Double payments.
 
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