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Discussion Starter #41
Donna,

You might not feel you're doing enough but you did say you do have some extra seed and a stockpile and so at least you're on the right track.

Some is better than none ... keep working on it, sweetie and you'll get there! :)

Love,

Jen

WOW - ya'll have great ideas. I have extra seeds and a stockpile - but not near enough. We are struggling financially and can't do much more.
 

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Well, it's been 2-3 months since you all last posted. A financial depression may be more of a reality than what we thought in July. So here is my list of what I would do.

Finish my heirloom seed shopping and actually place that darned order!

Stockpile more flour and baking goods.
Stock up on more canning lids (I just bought 10 cases of jars recently) Yay

Continue our stockpile of wood--it's free since fil collects and breaks down wooden pallets. (you should see their stockpile of wood)

read more self help books

stock up on postage stamps (during the depression I wouldnt have internet)

try to cut my electric bill even more since everyone around here has had about a $100 increase over the last month

I still have some of my grandmas rationing cards from WWII--I've got to store some sugar! More sugar--my pantry surely doesnt have enough.

purchase the parts to make an oil lamp with a canning jar (see your Lehmans catty- I'm sure there are other places too--I just came across that one first)

My parents and dh are giving me a greenhouse for Christmas. I've got to learn more about greenhouses. We have lots of sunshine in the winter even if it is cold.

I need to continue to prepare winter clothes for the little girls.

Your lists have made me think of LOTS of things I need to do. I'm starting my journal tonight.

You all inspire me.
 
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I was wondering if there would be more posting on this topic considering the financial news of late - what they are trying to do now is stave off the next Great Depression. Let's hope it works.

As I read this, I realize that no amount of stockpiling is a complete answer. A depression would last years - 3,5,10,15 who knows. The last one, beginning with the stock market crash in 1929 lasted til WW2. I doubt many people will have that much food around. I'm definitely not saying don't stockpile, just don't think that even a year stockpile will get you through to the end.

Those who think they'll sell their house and move into someone else's house or the country, well, there will be very few people buying houses, so who are you going to sell it to? And with the current situation, even if someone wanted the house, they may not be able to get the loan anyhow. And with house prices sinking, you'd have to sell your house cheap, and would you be willing to do that? At what price would be your breaking point?
 

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And now that I said all that, what I think I should be doing...

Expanding and improving soil in garden.

Save money. Save money. Save money. Save money. Save money.

Have more cash in the house.

Buy flannel sheets for all the beds.

Read about how they managed the last time. Anyone have any suggested books?

Kids - Make sure they know how to entertain themselves without money.
Self organize games with neighborhood kids - whiffle ball, street hockey, football etc.
Read with them, family board game nights, teach them card games and chess. Drawing.
Teach them sewing, knitting, cooking, woodworking and any other skills you have. You can never have too many skills.

It is the kids who know nothing but watching tv, being on the computer and playing video games who will have the toughest time. Those who haven't learned to use their imaginations and just enjoy playing with other kids. And those who don't know what to do with themselves once the entertainment committee has left. I guess they'll learn.

I'm hoping that as long as DH stays employed that we'll be fine. But that is the million dollar question ... will he stay employed and unfortunately there is no way to know. I have a SIL who is a PhD chemist who was convinced that she'd never be laid off. Well, they closed the entire building and laid off 10,000 total in many locations. So in the end, it didn't matter how valuable her project was or how good of a job she did.
 

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I need to start paying off all of our debt. Right now it is a struggle and is only going to get worse as winter comes and DH work slows down (plumbing is always slow in the winter in Michigan)

~ Learn to use that sewing machine (or 1 of the 3) that are collecting dust.

~ Continue to stock pile where I can

~ Make Christmas gifts this year, to save money and help PDD

~ Go through entire house and sell any and everything we do not use and do that now to help PDD

Good greef, ya know back in 2001 I told one of my good friends that we were headed for a depression... I wish I would have done then what I said I was going to do. I would be in much better shape...
 

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Good greef, ya know back in 2001 I told one of my good friends that we were headed for a depression... I wish I would have done then what I said I was going to do. I would be in much better shape...
Hindsight is always 20/20, as they say :shake:

Reading this lit a fire in my belly again to start stocking up. I've slacked a bit in the last few months :bolt:

The things I will be working on for the rest of the current year are:
  • stockpiling TP, soap for DH, paper towels
  • stockpiling more rice, sugar, flour, baking soda
  • make own laundry soap and stockpile in existing laundry soap containers
  • stockpiling emerg. candles and lamp oil; double check everything to make sure its in working order and bring indoors from the garage; setup crank lantens in bedroom & living room for use in case of emergency power outages
  • extra fuel canisters for the camping stove (for use in case of emergency/power outages)
  • double check the wear-n-tear on our flannel sheets; repair any defects
  • stock up on any extra fleece blankets I can find that are a good price (compare buying fleece and making my own to storebought) - Canadian Tire has a great "utility fleece blanket" for $4.99 in case anyone is interested
  • inventory canned food items; stock up on anything missing or low
  • inventory dog and cat food; stock up on variety of wet foods for all 3 animals and on dry food
  • make window quilts for basement windows and apply plastic window covers to conserve heat
  • chop up the reminder of the fire wood and bring an armload indoors
  • make meals from scratch; use cookbook "More with Less" for inspiration
  • DH is going hunting in Nov. so resolve to not buy any BEEF since we'll have venison and only purchase fryer chickens for rotisseries and to make stock out of
  • learn to can fruit and veggies when they are on sale
  • work any available OT in order to put money into EF and pay down debts
  • borrow books from library to learn about pioneer life/cooking and depression era life/cooking; LEARN from those that made it

Its a long list but necessary to make sure we get through this winter with minimal setbacks, especially financially. Thus far, the Canadian economy seems to be rumbling along but I dont want to chance it incase it goes sour like our neighbours to the South :shake:
 

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One more I just thought of:
  • learn to sprout at home during the winter for a longterm supply of fresh sprouts for ourselves and as a suppliment for the animals (lots of health benefits to sprouts)

This I hope will help keep our grocery bill down to just bying canned veggies for cooking rather than buying freshly imported veggies. No need to spend an arm and a leg on fresh once :fan: if I can supplement our diet with sprouts.

For info, if any one is interested, can be found here at SproutPeople.
 

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One more I just thought of:
  • learn to sprout at home during the winter for a longterm supply of fresh sprouts for ourselves and as a suppliment for the animals (lots of health benefits to sprouts)

This I hope will help keep our grocery bill down to just bying canned veggies for cooking rather than buying freshly imported veggies. No need to spend an arm and a leg on fresh once :fan: if I can supplement our diet with sprouts.

For info, if any one is interested, can be found here at SproutPeople.
I do this. Plus I have a mix called "micro-greens" that I can grow in the kitchen window sill for salad type greens for winter.
 

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I started preparing 3 years ago when I was laid off. We now have:

a years worth of food, paper products, toiletries, otc meds stockpiled.

I learned to make my own soap and cleaning products

I learned and continue to learn everything I can about frugality

I've started learning to garden, indoors and out. I bought two earthboxes from Amazon. I'm presently growing lettuce, tomatoes and cucumbers

I bought a newspaper log maker from Ebay and I make newspaper logs. We save all twigs and branches that fall from our trees for kindling. I also collect fallen pinecones and dip them in paraffin to make firestarters. We buy a cord of wood a year for our fireplace.

This year I am going to buy another portable electric heater and a new quilt.

I started a second income from home that is paying off.

We save money including all of our change.

Cook and bake everything from scratch.

I pray a lot!
 

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Well like most of you i would stock up on supplies but i would also stock up on my favorite chocolate candy and foods so you could treat yourself every once in a while. Yarn, books and learning to sew would also be on my list.
 

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I forgot, we also paid our car off.

I realize a years worth of food won't get you through 10 years of severe hardship, but it will give you a years headstart. Each year I plan on preparing for the following year.
 

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I would buy either a milk cow or milk goats.
Find a good supply of heirloom seeds.
Stock up as much as I could.
Put in a fireplace insert and get a good supply of wood.
Get a wood cook stove, even though I do not know where I would put it inside the house it would be ok on the carport.
Stock up on lamp oils, candles, and matches.
Replace any essentials that are not in good working order.
Stock up on canning supplies, especially rings and lids.
Start now changing over to a simpler diet so that it would be in place and not such a shock to start eating this way.
Stock up on underwear, socks, and then replace any shoes that would be essential.
I am sure there is more but this is a start.

Thanks for this thread. It has really gotten me thinking.
 

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And now that I said all that, what I think I should be doing...

Expanding and improving soil in garden.

Save money. Save money. Save money. Save money. Save money.

Have more cash in the house.

Buy flannel sheets for all the beds.

Read about how they managed the last time. Anyone have any suggested books?

Kids - Make sure they know how to entertain themselves without money.
Self organize games with neighborhood kids - whiffle ball, street hockey, football etc.
Read with them, family board game nights, teach them card games and chess. Drawing.
Teach them sewing, knitting, cooking, woodworking and any other skills you have. You can never have too many skills.

It is the kids who know nothing but watching tv, being on the computer and playing video games who will have the toughest time. Those who haven't learned to use their imaginations and just enjoy playing with other kids. And those who don't know what to do with themselves once the entertainment committee has left. I guess they'll learn.

I'm hoping that as long as DH stays employed that we'll be fine. But that is the million dollar question ... will he stay employed and unfortunately there is no way to know. I have a SIL who is a PhD chemist who was convinced that she'd never be laid off. Well, they closed the entire building and laid off 10,000 total in many locations. So in the end, it didn't matter how valuable her project was or how good of a job she did.

You are right about the kids entertaining themselves! I know many families that will have such a SHOCK to have to figure out how to keep their kids or should I say help their kids be entertained. I'm very fortunate that my kids love to play in their fort. There was no floor in it when we moved here and it's been the best babysitter---I mean entertainment than we ever imagined. I'm so glad we put in a new floor for it and railing.

Flannel Sheets! Great idea. I need to add that to my list! We usually dont get terribly cold, but one never knows and since I've read this years Farmers Almanac....I should really take immediate action on this.
 

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It looks like most of the items have been covered already, but here are some of mine:

1. Think about a garden. This is our big weakness. My finding the time (and energy).
2. Stock up on long-term foods. Rice, beans, wheat, etc. Work on cooking from these foods. Start changing over diet.
3. Stock up on medicines and herbs. Prescription meds are the hardest. Herbs can fill in where needed.
4. Think about entertainment. What will you do for fun?
5. Stock up on pet supplies, both foods and medicines.
6. Look into cheap (and local foraging). Dandelions, acorns, etc.
7. Have women's supplies ready. I already use reusable stuff, but I also have an extra set for long term.
8. Stock up on clothes for all seasons at thrift store.
9. Stock up on underwear, socks, working shoes for all members. If kids, think about when they get bigger.
10. Go to the doctor and get whatever is needed done. Also think about innoculations like tetanus and hepatitis. (In case of disaster, these 2 shots could save your life.)
11. Spiritual preparedness. This I'm working on. Probably the hardest in some cases.
12. Defense? Worst case scenario. Again, hard. My husband has a mental illness, and so lethal weapons are not an option in our house.
13. Stock up on house necessities. Learn to make do. Clean with simple stuff like vinegar and baking soda.
14. Think about lighting, heating, cooking, etc with low or no energy. LED lights can save wattage, PV panels can generate electricity. Think about crank appliances. Solar cookers can cook during the hottest months. Research how to heat and cool your home cheaply.
15. Local laws for livestock. Personally, I would love to have chickens and goats. Some cities don't allow this. Check your local laws.
16. Think about the deflation of currency. Also, if there is a bank run, what will you do?

wichitaamismom
:bath:
 

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StacyY would you be so inclined to share wat you are doing from home for income. If not I will understand. have a great day.
 

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During the Great Depression my grandparents had a little farm and raised all their food so my grandpa wasn't ever really out of work. I wonder if there would be a financial depression now if ANYONE would have jobs. Of course doctors, fireman, police but what about just the everyday people? This of course really piques my interest. Maybe I should ask my city government what kind of emergency preparedness THEY have.

If the banks should fail, would people still go to work? I frankly don't want my husband going to work for free. There will be plenty to do around here. How do people pay their landlord? If there is no money what happens then?

When the stock market crashed in the late 20's wasn't money worthless? or was it only paper $$.
 

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Discussion Starter #57
As I read this thread I got to thinking ... what about us maybe having a thread for this in the "Challenges" section to help keep us on track with actually implementing the things we need to do.

Obviously all of the thing couldn't be done at one time but we can do things one step at a time, right?

Maybe we could pick one thing at a time to work on and then go from there, such as with those who want to learn how to sew ...

they could post their goal and then start on it [even if it's just dusting the machine off !] If you're like me, sometimes the actually starting even if it a very small start, is enough to get me going.

Anyways, just an idea that I thought I'd mention to see what everybody thinks. :)

As for myself, I can make lists and more lists but it's just the getting started on them that I have a problem with.
 

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As I read this thread I got to thinking ... what about us maybe having a thread for this in the "Challenges" section to help keep us on track with actually implementing the things we need to do.

Obviously all of the thing couldn't be done at one time but we can do things one step at a time, right?

Maybe we could pick one thing at a time to work on and then go from there, such as with those who want to learn how to sew ...

they could post their goal and then start on it [even if it's just dusting the machine off !] If you're like me, sometimes the actually starting even if it a very small start, is enough to get me going.

Anyways, just an idea that I thought I'd mention to see what everybody thinks. :)

As for myself, I can make lists and more lists but it's just the getting started on them that I have a problem with.

I have that same disorder! LOL.

I think that's you have a great idea. (post the link ok? I'm still trying to figure my way thru this town....I mean village)
 

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"How would you prepare for a financial depression?"

Ceashels tends the garden. I tend the ammo. ;)
 
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