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Not one to really look or follow directions....I just put the squash in the crockpot with seasonings (down south that includes bacon grease) and added hot water. Turned it on high and let it go...... you can tell a difference from fresh, but it was still good and hubby ate it. That's the test - will he eat it and will he eat it again. Both answers were yes! Next summer more squash in the dehydrator!
 

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When we had more squash than we could eat we would make up some squash pies. You can use any squash and your standard pumpkin pie recipe, Cookig time may have to be adjusted. We always used the blender to mix them. We would freeze the cooked pies and then thaw and heat in the oven. Those were the best ever! We used summer squash growing up, but I have used winter squash and they were just as good if not better.
 

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Josephgoins - you've popped my brain with an idea - squash and onion pie - kinda like a quiche.....bet the ole hubby might eat that.

thanks for the inspiration!
 

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That sounds delicious and I'm so glad it worked out well for you! Since you had such a positive experience with it, I think I'll try dehydrating some summer squash next summer too! Thanks for letting us know how it turned out :)
 

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My aunt used to make candied squash. Cooked down the squash with just a little water and when the water cooked out, she added butter, sugar, vanilla & cinnamon. I still love it and I don't like "a little sugar" added to my veggies. Dehydrated squash would work well.
 

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How did you process the summer squash to dehydrate? - Just slice or puree or what? Mahalo!!
 

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Small, immature, summer squash (or zucchini) work best for dehydrating. Pick them before seeds form inside. Wash and cut into 1/8-inch slices without peeling for "chips" and 1/4-inch slices for rehydrating. I use a mandoline for cutting the slices so they are the same thickness. If you place similar-sized slices on the tray, they will dry in approximately the same length of time. So I put all the smaller end slices on one tray, until I have about 3-sizes of slices on three different trays.

Dry thin slices for chips until dry and crispy in a 120°F dehydrator. Thicker slices, dry until leathery to crisp.

It's also important to dip the slices in an acid bath before you dehydrate them, or blanch for 4 minutes in an acid water solution, drain and dehydrate. This will aid in preventing bacteria, including Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella species and Listeria monocytogenes. Use 1/4 t. citric acid to 1-quart water.

We use thin-sliced dehydrated summer squash and zucchini as a replacement for potato chips at our house.
 
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