Frugal Village Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I tried to look for another thread on this topic but my internet connection is SO SLOW that I gave up. I started my vegetable stock bag today! I now have a large ziploc bag in the freezer, with the wild celery stalks that I had left over after making bean soup for lunch.

I know about putting celery bits and carrot ends, but I need more ideas! What else do you put in the veggie stock bag?

I have a bunch of parsley and I don't think I can use it before it goes bad - is that too "strong" flavored for a stock bag?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,569 Posts
I found this, thought it may help.

Vegetable Stock

With the exception of cabbages (which include broccoli and cauliflower), which can overpower the flavor of vegetable stock, you can use all kinds of vegetables for this stock. The flavor will vary slightly, depending on the mix you use. Tomatoes can also overwhelm stock flavor, so while I do use them, I keep the amount small (unless of course, you want a strong tomato flavor). Some people feel that asparagus also overwhelms the stock. I personally don't agree, and find that asparagus adds a depth and richness to vegetable stock.

Stock Making 101 - How to Make Soup Stocks - - FabulousFoods.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
955 Posts
I can confirm that asparagus CAN overwhelm a stock if added in too great a percentage. I do celery ends and some leaves (I always include some whenever I use the stalks too), carrot peels, onion skins, leek leaves, corn, older mushrooms, garlic peels (and occasionally a whole clove of garlic), etc. I'm pretty loose with it all and it just about always ends up tasty. :)

I also will use up smidges of leftover herbs (chives, basil, oregano, sage, rosemary, parsley), but generally not large amounts of strong flavored ones.

When you cook the stock, don't forget to throw in some whole black peppercorns. If you are cooking anything with bones (i.e. chicken stock), add some vinegar (I use chive blossom vinegar, but any kind will do) to draw the calcium out of the bones. Generally up to 1/4 cup in a gallon of stock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,934 Posts
I have two containers in my freezer, one for stock, one for "soup starter". The soup starter is for odds and ends from meals, diced up. Eventually, I'll make chili out of it, mainly because the spices for chili will overpower some of the items.

For stock, I put in the ends of all the vegetables I cut up. Tomatoes, onions (not the papery part), carrots, celery, herbs, just about anything. If I roast a chicken, I'll shove the bones in there, too.

For a while, I froze the stock in small yogurt containers. Now, I can the stock with a pressure canner.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
20,731 Posts
I keep a bag of peelings and stuff in the freezer till I cook a turkey, then I freeze the meat in meal-sized portions for making other meals, and use the frozen bag of veggie scraps and the turkey carcass to make about three gallons of stock. Of course if you want veggie stock, just leave out the turkey bones.

I put almost anything that can be frozen into the bag. No potato peels. The papery skins from garlic and onions can go in there. Carrot scrapings, cabbage hearts, almost anything that sounds good. I don't add any herbs or spices because I add those when I make each individual dish later, depending on what goes well in that dish. I NEVER add salt! One of the advantages of making my own is getting salt-free broth.

It doesn't really matter what you put in there, within reason. I never make mine the same way and it's always good.

What I love about my homemade broth is that I get great food out of what's basically garbage. A 14 oz. can of broth in the store (less than two cups) goes for about $1.50 and it's so salty you can hardly eat it. :yuck: I can make three gallons for the cost of a little bit of propane and some canning jar lids. Can't beat that!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for these suggestions - I'll incorporate them all. It feels good to get some use out of things I've been throwing away - and I particularly like being able to make stock w/o added salt. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,299 Posts
I keep 4 stock bags -- 1 for 'soup base', 1 for poultry bones, 1 for ham bones and 1 for 'Italian'.

The soup base bag contains celery, carrots, onions, etc

The Italian bag will have eggplant, garlic, onions, peppers, spinach, tomatoes, etc... the more heartier veggies that usually come to play in Italian meals (if it would go in to a pasta sauce, it goes in the bag) and I make the minestrones, meatball and wedding (etc) types with them.

My Philosophy: No Vegetable Left Behind!
 
  • Like
Reactions: greekislandgirl

·
Registered
Joined
·
955 Posts
The papery skins of onions are one of the things that lend a golden color to the stock. Definitely throw them in.

Glad you mentioned not using potato peels, Spirit Deer. I forgot to say that I have read that potato peels can add an unattractive grey color to stock. I haven't tested it myself to see if it is true.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
20,731 Posts
Raw potatoes turn black when they're frozen. I don't know if they could be used if cooked. I guess I don't see why not, but I'm not that dedicated. Besides, we eat the peels so there aren't any being thrown away anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Lady_V, I love your idea of having several bags. Just tonight as I was chopping the tops off of strawberries, I thought "too bad I can't put the strawberry tops in my stock bag!" haha that would be weird....

We always eat the potato peels (and carrot peels too) for the extra fiber/vitamins so I won't be using those. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,934 Posts
Lady_V, I love your idea of having several bags. Just tonight as I was chopping the tops off of strawberries, I thought "too bad I can't put the strawberry tops in my stock bag!" haha that would be weird....
This got me thinking, is there anything that can be done with the peels or tops of fruits? I eat a fair amount of fruit, and it would be cool if I could find something to do with the banana peels, apple cores, orange peels, or strawberry tops. I've seen where people have used rinds for jelly, but is there anything else?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
955 Posts
Apple peels and cores can be used to make jelly.

Orange peels could be zested for baking and cooking. The zest can be dehydrated.

google banana peels - they have a bunch of uses (polishing leather, for houseplants, etc.)

Not sure about strawberry tops...

Plus of course composting is always an option too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
mndtrp - do you eat a lot of citrus? I save the peels, cut them into quarters (if something small like a lime or lemon; eighths if larger) and freeze them. Once it gets close to Christmas or some other holiday, I boil them in water three times, then in sugar syrup, then let dry overnight and dust with sugar - result: citrus peel candy, which I give as gifts.

I would like to find out how to make that jelly out of apple peels and cores for when I make applesauce, I usually only make small batches and eat the applesauce fresh, but I could be freezing the peel and cores as I go. I wonder if other fruit bits could go in there too.

Today I added zucchini ends to my stock bag :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: madjen
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top