Frugal Village Forums banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I grew up in Wisconsin and Illinois, but I've lived in Texas for the last quarter century.

Lately, I've felt this tug to move back to the Midwest. I miss the change of seasons, but I don't think I could hack long winters.

My job lets me live anywhere, so as long as there's an internet connection, I'm in business.

Any recommendations? I've felt pretty comfortable in places like Lincoln, Nebraska and Wichita. Wouldn't want any big metropolitan areas...any good mid-size towns? Topeka? Sioux City? Jefferson City?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
Jefferson City is a nice location. It has decent internet depending where you are in town. Columbia is 1/2 hour away if you need something you can't get in town.

The winters aren't particularly long. They do get some snow and an ice storm every few years, but the snow melts off between storms. It doesn't stay below freezing for weeks or months.

Fall color can be outstanding. The summers can be really hot and humid, but if you have been living in TX, you are probably used to it. I lived in Houston as a kid. The summers there were hotter and more humid than in the mid-MO area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,024 Posts
Stay in Tx... the winters bite and will add a considerable amount of costs to your budget.
Hey... how about the Carolinas? that's a perfect place to live.. super mild winters.. and not too hot summers.

If I could live anywhere.... that's where I would be. But don't take advice from this woman... I've never left the eastern coast board in my life. I'm scared to cross time zones.

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
489 Posts
Sioux City is an absolutely miserable town (dirty, smelly, devoid of cultural opportunities, and brimming with small minded people). There are only a few areas in Iowa that I would consider: the Des Moines metro area, Iowa City or Ames if you like the feel of a college town, or possibly the Quad Cities.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,435 Posts
Raising my hand over here in Boise! It doesn't get much better than this! Four seasons, none extreme. Beautiful recreational areas, and clean living.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,416 Posts
Omaha is a possibility. We get top name performers here ( music and comedy), the zoo is excellent, we have the Storm Chasers ( minor league team of K.C. Royals), we're less than an hour from Lincoln if you want to go to a Husker Football game. We do get snow but it is almost always easy to deal with, there has only been one winter in my 27 years of living here that was bad. Medical care and shopping are good. Plus...I'm here!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,280 Posts
Topeka gets CRAZY bad weather...as does Wichita....also the Wichita economy as a whole has suffered after losing Boeing...I would not live either of those places.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,058 Posts
I agree with Boise. It is an amazing combination of good 4-season weather, outdoor recreation, culture, shopping and low-cost housing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,605 Posts
If you can work anywhere, I assume you have the same salary anywhere.

You could factor in the cost of living in certain places. You know more for your money. One place you might get more house for your money. That sort of thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,849 Posts
I moved to Iowa out of necessity and would not recommend it at all. Too cold, long winters, high cost of living..... I moved from MO and would go back in a heartbeat. The middle corridor is nice: from St. Louis through Columbia and to KC. I lived on the St Louis side, but outside the metro area. It was wonderful. We were an hour out of the city, so we had small town living with big city amenities nearby. Jeff City and Columbia are good places, and Springfield is awesome. Our cost of living in MO was low and our salaries were quite decent. We experienced all four seasons, but winter came later and spring came earlier. Try staying a week or so in different places and see what you think!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,930 Posts
Michigan is cheap to live in and if you can work from home even cheaper. But you cant be a winter wimp. We have beautiful fall esp. in the U.P. (internet would be spotty in some places but Marquette is so internet friendly the Pres. went up to check it out. Although super snowy.
Better to stay in Nebraska or something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,416 Posts
Topeka gets CRAZY bad weather...as does Wichita....also the Wichita economy as a whole has suffered after losing Boeing...I would not live either of those places.
Random thought...isn't Wichita where that Dennis Rader, the BTK dude, was from?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
I live in Indiana.I get sick of the winters but I grew up in this little town (900 people) and I wouldn't live anywhere else honestly. I have lived other places in the past but nothing could compare to the people of the Midwest. The kindness that just comes natural to them is just so great. Walk down the street and people say hi even if they don't know you. In the summer you can go into our post office and find produce that has overrun their garden in a box marked "free" its like living in Mayberry all the time. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,869 Posts
I hope no one minds too much if I piggy back on this. I have a similar situation though I would not be moving till retirement.

I feel very drawn to the Midwest, but the weather is a potential concern.

Can you build up a resistance to cold weather after a year or two?

I grew up in a part of the US with cold winters and mild summers. For quite a while now I have lived in a place that has hot summers and mild winters. I have learned to tolerate hot summers. However, I am not as good at handling cold anymore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,538 Posts
We have central heating and indoor plumbing in the midwest now, so I don't think you'll be too uncomfortable. :) Our summers are hot and muggy, and our winters are cold and snowy, but we don't get so much snow it can't be shoveled like places up north. Probably here the weather is not much different than where you are now, maybe it just comes on slightly different dates for different lengths of time.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,680 Posts
The scientific answer is no, people don't acclimate to cold weather. The real world answer is yes, we do. Thirty degrees in October feels a lot different than 30 in February. And if you're retired, you usually have the option to stay home if the weather isn't amenable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,869 Posts
Thank you. Sometimes I need a little reassurance that this is not a completely crazy idea. I am weighing the idea of not going outside when it is bad weather v. the idea that I might not leave the house at all for a month or two during winter. But I suppose that would not be too bad.

I mentioned this before on other posts, but my ideal is to have a condo or apartment downtown with an art museum that I could walk to. In other words, where I go someplace with only having to be outside maybe 10 minutes or so. During nice weather, I would take longer walks though.

It is hard to put in words, but the places I have been to in the Midwest just have a kind of vibe or feeling that makes me feel comfortable. But more than that, they feel like "home" in a way that my actual home town, and my current hometown do not. Like it is where I belong.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top