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Other than garage sales, where can I possibly find an inexpensive pressure cooker?

TIA,
Sara
 

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lol I was going to say garage sales. Hmm how about thrift shops. lol

I am guessing you want a new one, right? Hmm I would start calling around or shopping around. Don't forget a lot of hardware stores carry pressure canners.

If you decide to buy a used one make sure you replace the seals. My pc is the one my mom had when she first got married, so it is @ 30 years old. Harvest yellow even :) Anyway, I was able to purchase new seals at the hardware store. Better safe than sorry with something like that.

Christy
 

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You might want to check out Ebay.....i do occasionally and got a really good deal last year on a 21 quart tall model Presto....45 dollars plus shipping......not too bad! I use mine to can....maybe you want a smaller one??

Tamara
 

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I just bought mine off walmart.com... It's a 23 quart presto..
I was reading reviews and I found that the presto is the most "passed down" pressure canner/cookers because it lasts! I paid about $90 for it but it'll last a long time. :D
 

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If you decide to buy a used one make sure you replace the seals. My pc is the one my mom had when she first got married, so it is @ 30 years old. Harvest yellow even :) Anyway, I was able to purchase new seals at the hardware store. Better safe than sorry with something like that.

Christy
I will be curious to see what others say about a used one. This might be one appliance that I would DEFINITELY want new. You not only want the good seals but I would want to have the meter/guage (or whatever it is called) checked to make sure it is accurate.

This is, of course, thinking that buying a new one would be GOOD and not RECALLED!!! (or made in China or.....) :laugh: (sorry---feeling a little.........well, a LOT cynical today!!)
 

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I know this is an old post, but I wanted to put in my two cents.

The older pressure cookers were known for failing. That is the reason that most of our Grandparents didn't use them. They considered them unsafe.

When you are buying one, remember how these work. They are basically steam engines. One small flaw and they can explode and seriously injure you or anyone who happens to be near.

When purchasing anything that you are going to use for a long time, remember the first rule of Frugality, buy good quality, take care of it and it will last forever.

With that said, I have a Mirro that my mother bought when I was young. I have replaced the seal in it when the other started showing the slightest sign of age. As recommended by the manufacturer we do not use metal utensils or anything that may scratch the inside.

I know it’s tempting to purchase these used for cheap, but I wouldn’t do it. You can get a good quality Mirro at Wal-mart for less than $50 that will last you the rest of your life if you take care of it. Make the investment and never have to worry about it again.
 

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Just saw one at the used clothing store for $10 including recipe book which you do not get with the newer ones

The one I saw is the same one I got when I got married 35 years ago and am still using.
 

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I got mine free. :) post on your facebook page you are looking for one you might be surprised what you come up with. That's what I did and had someone tell me they had one new in a box that they never used and I could have it for free.
 

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Pressure cookers and pressure canners are two different animals. I would purchase either used although not over 40 years old. Parts and seals are available for cookers and canners. I've replaced two pressure gauges and many seals thru the years. Our Extension Service tests pressure gauges each year for a modest fee.

I purchased my canners (2) at estate auctions for $10 and $6. One of my two pressure pans was purchased at an estate auction for $5 -- it had never been used. I've been using it for about 10 years without replacing the seal and its still in excellent condition. The other I got new probably 40 years ago with trading stamps (remember those?). I think I've replaced the seal once.

I pressure can a minimum of 100 jars each year so my canners do get used. The pressure pans are each used regularly. One is larger than the other so size of what I'm cooking depends which is used.

You might consider placing an ad requesting the item you want and see who bites.
 

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I will be curious to see what others say about a used one. This might be one appliance that I would DEFINITELY want new. You not only want the good seals but I would want to have the meter/guage (or whatever it is called) checked to make sure it is accurate.
Or you could get one that doesn't have seals and uses a weight instead of a gauge to control pressure.
 

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I'm sure after eleven years, Sara has found a pressure canner/cooker, but it's fun to talk about this stuff anyway. Other than garage sales or thrift stores, I have no idea where to get a great deal on a canner.

I bought a vintage harvest gold pressure canner several years ago at a garage sale for $2. For some reason, it had a spare weight that was not for that canner. I almost donated it to GW, but for some reason didn't.

Then last fall, I found a smaller, like new canner at GW that holds seven pint jars and is perfect for the small batches I like to can. It was also two dollars, but was missing the weight. But I knew the spare weight I had gotten with the first one would fit it, and it does. Lucky! And I also had a manual for that exact canner, that I had gotten cheap at another sale because I have a vintage pressure cooker made by the same company, and both of them use the same manual. Lucky again! I just love that canner because it's so much easier to handle than my big one.

If you feel of the seal in a canner, you can tell if it's still good because it'll be soft and flexible. If it's hard and brittle, it needs to be replaced. The over-pressure plugs need to be replaced periodically too, if they get hard.
 

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I was always told never to buy a used one.Because after years of use the pressure gauge could be damaged and the seal might not be good. I know some seals can be replaced. I did find on at a garage sale a few years ago. The seal was bad. I searched and searched for the rubber seal, did find one, but it never fit good. I was told by many not to use it because of that. So last year i broke down and bought a brand new one. This is the one i bought and also while i was at it bought 2 replacement seals.. I got mine for $99 free shipping plus $18 for the 2 extra seals.Amazon.com: Wolfgang Puck 5-Qt. Electronic Pressure Cooker: Kitchen & Dining
 

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Gauges need to be checked annually, and that doesn't matter if the canner is new or used so that's a wash when considering new vs. used. It's easy to see if a seal is working or not, because steam will escape around the lid if it's not. If no steam escapes and the pressure plug pops up like it should, then you know it's got a good seal.

I've heard that too that you shouldn't buy a used cooker or canner, but I haven't seen a good reason why not yet. All of mine are used except my electronic one, and they all work perfectly.

Not criticizing you at all, just sayin' in general how I've looked at the reasons not to buy used. :)
 

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I know this is an old post, but I wanted to put in my two cents.

The older pressure cookers were known for failing. That is the reason that most of our Grandparents didn't use them. They considered them unsafe.

When you are buying one, remember how these work. They are basically steam engines. One small flaw and they can explode and seriously injure you or anyone who happens to be near.

When purchasing anything that you are going to use for a long time, remember the first rule of Frugality, buy good quality, take care of it and it will last forever.

With that said, I have a Mirro that my mother bought when I was young. I have replaced the seal in it when the other started showing the slightest sign of age. As recommended by the manufacturer we do not use metal utensils or anything that may scratch the inside.

I know it’s tempting to purchase these used for cheap, but I wouldn’t do it. You can get a good quality Mirro at Wal-mart for less than $50 that will last you the rest of your life if you take care of it. Make the investment and never have to worry about it again.
Blow up? Poppycock!
 

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Gauges need to be checked annually, and that doesn't matter if the canner is new or used so that's a wash when considering new vs. used. It's easy to see if a seal is working or not, because steam will escape around the lid if it's not. If no steam escapes and the pressure plug pops up like it should, then you know it's got a good seal.

I've heard that too that you shouldn't buy a used cooker or canner, but I haven't seen a good reason why not yet. All of mine are used except my electronic one, and they all work perfectly.

Not criticizing you at all, just sayin' in general how I've looked at the reasons not to buy used. :)
I know, right? Can't believe everything you read on the internet!

I have three old Presto canners from the 50s, the 7b and 21b, one was my grandmother's. Also 2 Presto pressure cookers and a Mirro pressure cooker/canner. I just can't help myself when I see them at the thrift stores for a few bucks.

These things don't just "blow up", just as guns don't just "go off".

I will suggest, if buying used, to get a unit that still has parts available. And don't buy some oddball from the turn of the last century or something. The popular post-war canners made by National Presto, Mirro and All American are the big 3 AFAIK, and still have gaskets, weights and safety plugs and gauges available. At least the ones that I have do. If the rubber bits are brittle replace them. But if they leak they won't build pressure. They won't explode. Also make sure you have the rack or metal plate to keep food or cans off the bottom of the vessel, or come up with something that does that.

Most of the problems I read about relate to cooking with the pots too full, like a pot of beans boiling up and plugging the weight stem. Then they over-pressure and pop the rubber plug and "explode" beans all over the ceiling. This is not the same as "explode" like a bomb. And 15lbs pressure just ain't that much!

I would also recommend having a canner with a jiggle weight, not a gauge only. The old Mirros had a weight that had 3 holes in it and was used for 5, 10 and 15 lb. The Prestos like mine had a gauge only so constant babysitting to keep constant temp was necessary to keep constant pressure. But I converted them to the new 3 piece weight set 50332 using a new stem 1058. So now the weight keeps the pressure constant and I also don't have to get the gauges checked every year or replace them with equally inaccurate new gauges for $20 each. (been there, did that too)

I like the heavy cast aluminum old American made cookers. The new cookers have silicone gaskets which are nice, and even more safety features that lock the lids into place when under pressure. We live in a litigious society. But that doesn't mean the old ones are unsafe.

But then again, some folks can make anything dangerous, and they shouldn't be around a hot stove in the first place.
 
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