Frugal Village Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
The pandemic has changed our ways in work and life itself. Is this temporary or is this something that is going to last?

Is remote work going to be "a permanent scenario" ? And if yes, does it mean that we need to take action and adapt both companies and employees alike?

Are you preparing yourself to get back to the way we were or are you upgrading yourself for the new way of doing things?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,120 Posts
Upgrading yourself sounds a bit like the adds I see for training courses.

I have been teleworking full time since March of last year. There were not a lot of new skills involved. I learned to use Microsoft Teams. It is not hard to do. It takes about five minutes to know everything you need to be a participant. Setting up meeting or giving a presentation might mean watching a free 20 minute video to learn.

Most things are the same. I am emailing a document to someone 40 miles away instead of down the hall. Same skill.

But as mentioned before it depends on the job. Office jobs can generally be done virtually. But so many other jobs, nurse, factory worker, store clerk cannot be done virtually.

From an economic perspective the interesting thing is how it plays out in high cost of living areas. Where would people live if they did not have to commute into work?
Would people still live in or within commuting distance of major cities? Would the high rent apartments in the business district suddenly become affordable?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,933 Posts
Been work from home since March. Prior to the pandemic, the WFH option wasn't even remotely considered, even on rare occasions. Since that time, the company has realized that we are all capable of doing our jobs successfully, and the company saves a ton of money this way. While it hasn't been fully decided, it's likely that WFH will become permanent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,120 Posts
My husband and I both work for places that had been very stingy with telework prior to the pandemic. It was allowed, but no more than once a week. Since the pandemic, they have let us telework full time.

A strange thing happened with my husband's boss. There are these meetings where managers have an opportunity to brag about the successes of their team to the top level managers. Your success story has to be approved by middle management before you can share it. My husband's boss wanted to share that her team's performance increased significantly since teleworking full time. She was not allowed to share that information.

So I am not hugely optimistic. Upper management hold onto this idea that we are all doing a great job despite having to work from home. Actually most of us are doing a better job because we are working from home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,187 Posts
Upgrading yourself sounds a bit like the adds I see for training courses.

I have been teleworking full time since March of last year. There were not a lot of new skills involved. I learned to use Microsoft Teams. It is not hard to do. It takes about five minutes to know everything you need to be a participant. Setting up meeting or giving a presentation might mean watching a free 20 minute video to learn.

Most things are the same. I am emailing a document to someone 40 miles away instead of down the hall. Same skill.

But as mentioned before it depends on the job. Office jobs can generally be done virtually. But so many other jobs, nurse, factory worker, store clerk cannot be done virtually.

From an economic perspective the interesting thing is how it plays out in high cost of living areas. Where would people live if they did not have to commute into work?
Would people still live in or within commuting distance of major cities? Would the high rent apartments in the business district suddenly become affordable?
Yes here lots moved to lower cost areas or didn't have to make a long commute anymore
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,899 Posts
I hope so because i sure like working at home half time, could be full time but I need some social interaction. Personally, I think our department is less productive. We rely on getting answers quickly, usually yelling over the cubicle wall, but with remote working the response time has slowed a lot. I enjoy that if I'm not feeling 100% all I have to do it text my boss and let him know that I'll be working from home. He has no issues with that as long as we don't have any in-person meetings. Working from home means less sick days, no need to worry about spreading your germs when you "have to go to work" .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Oh hi Emma!!! another Emma here hahaha.
I think remote working is here to stay, but oh well, by this time you may have seen it too.
Before the pandemic I was semi-remotely working, meaning I used to go to the office of the company I work for onyl 2 times a week, for meetings and important updates and so, nowadays I am fully remote, I have actually moved from the place I used to live to a 4000km away place!!! (Yes, I crossed the whole country hahaha), so yeah, not for everyone, but for many, I think remote working is here to stay and it is for many people a blessing (although I understand for many is truly a challenge, and it is totally valid because not every business has the characteristics that will allow them to either make this transition or stay that way),,,, but anywho, for a lot of people working in technology, this has been a blessing in HUGE DARK disguise hehe,, we finally got more freedom and our company says our work flow and performance has grown more than 30% since we all are either at home of wherever we want to be! (WOW what a surprise that was)...

But anyway, new gal here in this forum and I just had to put my two cents because this is actually a topic that applies to me. Happy to be here :) and I hope everyone is doing great this holiday season.

- Miss Pie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
653 Posts
I an now allowed more remote work than before and find it a bit of a relief. But sometimes miss the complete work/home separation from the before times. My sister is in IT and went fully remote for 18months. Going back in she made her boss agree that she can be remote 2 months a year so she can rent a condo somewhere cool and just be gone without using up vacation time. The boss agreed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Self-improvement sounds a lot like the advertisements I see for training courses.


Since March of last year, I've been teleworking full-time. There weren't many new talents to learn. I learnt how to work with Microsoft Teams. It is not difficult to accomplish. It will take you around five minutes to learn what you need to know in order to participate. To understand how to set up a meeting or give a presentation, you may need to view a free 20-minute video. Also Check Out The majority of things are the same. Instead of walking down the hall, I'm emailing a paper to someone 40 miles away. Exactly the same ability.
However, as previously said, it is dependent on the work. Virtually doing office tasks is rather common.
However, many other vocations, such as nurse, manufacturing worker, and retail clerk, are not virtual.

What's intriguing from an economic standpoint is how it plays out in high-cost-of-living places. If people didn't have to commute to work, where would they live?
Would people still want to dwell in large cities or be able to commute to them? Is it possible that the high-rent flats in the commercial sector will become more affordable?
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top