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HI all,
My husband and I moved into a single wide mobile home last fall and we were thinking about stocking up on some items this coming fall/winter season.

Not so much as a money saver but to make getting groceries into the house easier during the cold, snowy,icy,New Hampshire winter months.

Since storage is at a minimum is it worth stocking up on paper products for the entire season and storing out in the shed or just go a month's worth at a time and try and store inside.

Canned goods I can probably do a seasons worth.
Stacy
 

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The only paper products we really use is T.P. Instead of paper towels try using rags or old towels and then laundering. In some cases newspaper works as a substitute for paper towels. We use cloth napkins, not paper. Relatively easy to make a lot of cloth napkins if you have leftover fabric from other projects. I have also cut up and hemmed old cotton tablecloths for good heavy napkins and dish towels. We don't use paper plates or drinking cups either.

If you make those changes then storing just T.P. should not be a problem. I have found that Scott 1000 goes a loooonnnnng way.
 

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Do you normally go out to the shed for things during the winter? It seems it would be just as cold and snowy to do that as to bring stuff in from the car after you went shopping. Or are you trying to avoid shopping in general during the worst part of winter? Is your shed dry and secure from critters? Squirrels and raccoons will chew through plastic looking for food, believe me. Paper products are not always well sealed and a small amount of moisture can ruin a package.

You have to ask yourself, are you saving time (avoiding a long drive to the store) or effort (getting stuff into the house ) or significant money (in gas, buying on sale) if you stockpile.
 

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I don't live in the cold. I'm in Florida but I agree with above on critters in the shed. There's also mice/rat problems with that idea besides the ones CH said. Do you have under bed storage you can use? If you have a laundry compartment in the hallway or a room dedicated for laundry/mudroom utilize shelves above the washer/dryer. Put more shelving.
 

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I guess I'm not clear on what question you're asking. Is your concern icy steps and walkways outside your house? That's a maintenance issue. If the access to your house is kept clear, it shouldn't make much difference to haul your stuff in winter or summer. Are you unfamiliar with winter weather in general? If not, can you do whatever you've done in the past with regard to socking up?
 

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We currently use cloth for napkins and cloth handkerchiefs. We use one roll of paper towels per week. The cloth towels were not worth doing for us as we only use them to clean up major messy spills and try to limit laundry.
 

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It is more my dealing with my arthitis in the cold of winter. Especially with sub zero temps. The less I have to carry in, the better as my hands and spine are very sore and stiff in winter. So I was thinking that it may be worth the initial expense to not have to deal with the bulky or heavy packages.
 

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Didn't think about the moisture getting into the packages. Not sure we have the room to store these bulky items inside the house. Right now I can store one package of TP and two rolls of paper towels where they are stored currently.
 

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T-paper

The only paper products we really use is T.P. Instead of paper towels try using rags or old towels and then laundering. In some cases newspaper works as a substitute for paper towels. We use cloth napkins, not paper. Relatively easy to make a lot of cloth napkins if you have leftover fabric from other projects. I have also cut up and hemmed old cotton tablecloths for good heavy napkins and dish towels. We don't use paper plates or drinking cups either.

If you make those changes then storing just T.P. should not be a problem. I have found that Scott 1000 goes a loooonnnnng way.
Not sure where you live, but Harris Teeter often has loss leader sales on things like toilet paper. When that happens, my sister and I go together (on Thursday to get the senior discount) and buy when our brand is on sale. It doesn't happen often, but we will buy up to the limit given in their ad and rarely have to buy at full price. Same thing with laundry detergent.

The best investment we seem to have made is a freezer, though. That's where a lot of stocking up goes on here. I never make one meatloaf; I'll make 5 or more and freeze them.

We lived in a single wide mobile home for years and you're right, there's not a lot of storage space, but you can get very creative!
 
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Maybe you can compromise and stock some of the heavy stuff like canned goods now, but buy the light, bulky stuff as needed so you don't have to store as much.

In our second single wide, we had a long hallway that was wide enough to add shelves made of 1x6 lumber. We put paperback books on them, but they could be built for canned goods, too. They should be set on the floor before being screwed to the wall, so the weight is transferred to the floor instead of stressing the wall. Do you have any space behind doors where storage shelves could be added?

Pinterest is a good place to look for storage ideas for small space living.
 

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I understand about the cold and arthritis, I have had it for 20+ years. I suggest getting creative with storage space. Under the bed, under the couch, behind the couch, under end tables, put extra shelves or hooks in closets. In short, look at every space, not just the normal places you would put things. Can you move something out to the shed for the winter to give you more room in the house?
 

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If you have space to stack the surplus items you could cover them with a colorful quilt or blanket. Maybe in the corners of the rooms.
I don't think I would keep items in a shed but that is just me.

I live in an apartment and we buy ahead some in the fall just to keep from having to drag it in. I do have a
rolling cart to come from car to door but when its cold I just want to get inside.

Another idea would be online ordering and have it delivered to your door. Probably not as frugal but if carrying
is a problem.

After reading this thread I think i will take an inventory and get a few things ahead. Good luck
 

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I stock up on a lot of things for the winter - I have really severe asthma (social security disability level asthma) and going outside when it is very cold can be dangerous for me, even with the closer parking afforded by a disability placard. I do have more room for storage though.

I don't typically stock up on paper products that much - I just do one of the bulk packages under the sink in each of the bathrooms and an extra in a cabinet in the garage. Paper towels are the same - one of the large packages in the garage, though that will last us a long time. I would worry about the potential for rodents to get to the paper if they were in an unattached building.

What I do stock up on are things that are harder to carry - heavier things that take longer to load in the car just because of weight, needing more bags, etc. I buy dish soap by the gallon at a bulk store, so I'll get a few gallons of that before it gets too cold. I'll do a household chemicals trip to walmart to stock up in late october or so - I buy enough laundry detergent, dishwasher liquid, bleach, a couple big boxes of baking soda for cleaning, other cleaners I may need, aluminum foil/plastic wrap/ziplock bags - pretty much everything that I will need for the winter. This year and the last time I had an infant, I'll get a ton of baby formula as well. At this point, I have a ton of heavy stuff, but if I'm having a bad day, customer service will get someone to help me load things.

I do a separate trip to the local bent and dent stores and then Aldi to pick up canned goods and other non-perishables.

I'd go with stocking up on the heavier but smaller things - paper product packages can be big, but they are lightweight and easier to move for me.
 
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