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Freebie Queen
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If you moved from the states to over seas, whether it's because your spouse is in the military or because of working and transferring with a company. What was the hardest change you had to get used to?

Same question for those who have moved to the states from overseas?

Do you miss something that you can't get here or there?

I ask because my husband and I have started talking about moving overseas for a certain amount of time during the year but not sure of the adjustments we would have to make? We are thinking Ireland, but there are many other countries we have in the running also.

Does it always rain in London? Does it ever snow in Ireland? Can I hook up a satelite if I lived in Ireland to catch the shows in the states and american football, LOL. Are there malls like here? Are all the flats in England small? Is the crime rate high in the city/town you live in? Is it hard to learn how to drive on the other side of the road, lol. Was it hard to figure out the currency change. Is there more naked people/cussing on tv (not cable)than in the states?

We only have what we see on tv and that's not much to go on? We do plan on visiting first. Thanks!
 

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If you moved from the states to over seas, whether it's because your spouse is in the military or because of working and transferring with a company. What was the hardest change you had to get used to? shopping at the grocery store every day is part of the culture. PIA. I never got used to the shoving on london streets or the queue jumping.

Same question for those who have moved to the states from overseas?

Do you miss something that you can't get here or there? mexican food and louisiana hot sauce

I ask because my husband and I have started talking about moving overseas for a certain amount of time during the year but not sure of the adjustments we would have to make? We are thinking IrelandGO! rent a furnished flat!, but there are many other countries we have in the running also.

Does it always rain in London? noDoes it ever snow in Ireland? Can I hook up a satelite if I lived in Ireland to catch the shows in the states and american football, no, and you won't hear country music either. LOL. Are there malls like here? yesAre all the flats in England small? like a shoeboxIs the crime rate high in the city/town you live in? Is it hard to learn how to drive on the other side of the road, lol. nauseating at first but your brain adjustsWas it hard to figure out the currency change. no, becuase you salary and pay and money in your hand, stop doing converting in your head and just do it. Is there more naked people/cussing on tv (not cable)than in the states? yes, blatant pronography on public BBC television after 10 pm. the cable full package has like, 10 channels. woo hoo. judge judy comes on at 4

We only have what we see on tv and that's not much to go on? We do plan on visiting first. Thanks!
it will be an adventure you will ever forget or regret! go! what will happens is you will start "doing as the romans do". stop trying to do things the american way and start doing things their way. blend in.
 
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Europe is not so different than the US, when it comes to the essentials. The accents are a little different and the names of some things are not the same but you will become accustomed to them quickly. A lot of our culture came from Europe with our grandparents and great grandparents. Like in America the weather changes and it will not always be rainy/cold/foggy/whatever in one place all the time. They have seasons too! Remember that TV relies a lot on stereotypes to make an impression or set a scene. Just think about how much of what you see on the tube is outrageous. I have had european acquaintances ask me if the crime in the US is as awful as what they see on their televisions (as if we should be afraid to leave our homes).

I don't think there's more sex and nudity, I think people are just less uptight about it. As in, nudity is a natural state and not something to be embarrassed or scandalized about. You'll see it on magazine covers in plain sight, instead of behind the counter. Alcohol is more available to teens, in some places the drinking age is 16, but I don't remember that being a problem when I was there in my teens, I did not see young people all that interested in drinking. Not that it never happens, but the norms and expectations are different.

I missed some favorite food on my last visit, but there was plenty of the local culture to enjoy in its place. American products, including television are much more available these days than they ever have been. You're not likely to feel completely alienated.
 

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Freebie Queen
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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks!

I know some things would be different and not be able to get some things that I get here, but that would be part of living in that country. I have dvd's of "Keeping up appearances" and "Are you being served" and I have had to look up some words because I hadn't any idea what a curb crawler was, etc or how some words are pronounced differently but have the same reason such as "raise".

When living in the New England area, I always thought there is some similarities from that area to England. Just from what I have read or seen.

I know I would have to get a large size refrigerator, I know I wouldn't like having to shop so much. It wouldn't be so bad if the milk was still delivered to your home but I'm sure most area's don't do that anymore.

How do you guys heat your home? Do you use natural gas? Coal? Oil? something I have never heard of before? Which is more popluar, carpet or wood floors? I noticed in some of the houses we were looking at, just to see the prices of houses in Ireland, that a lot of places have what look to be cement floors? Not sure why?
 

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GO FOR IT!! You will love Ireland. I found the people to be very warm and more than willing to help you with anything.

There are some things that you will miss but you make adjustments.

When I went to visit a friend in London I filled my suitcase (when you weren't so limited) with baggies......go figure. She had a family and it drove her nuts with the tiny sizes of things and the 'dorm room' size refer.

I wasn't real crazy about most of the food in London but I survived. Found things I did like and ate lots of that item. Learned to eat avocado, tomato, and cuke sandwich there and still love it to this day.

Some things that you miss at first you might find later but have to pay dearly for it. (IE: when I was living in Venezuela I had to go to a store that sold American type food to find popcorn. I love my popcorn and was paying over $2 for a microwave type bag of it!)

I say go for it..........it will be an experience that you will never forget. I loved Ireland and Scotland........London, not so much...too big.
 

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I am an American that lives in Germany on the border to the Netherlands. I have also lived in France and New Zealand. I haven't lived in the USA in more than 10 years.

I miss Mexican food the most, but now days its so much easier to come by if you can can cook it yourself some.

Germany is in general safer than the US and many parts of Europe are that way. We also have the drinking age of 16, I have never had issues with this. We just like to celebrate Soccer a bit much. :)

We do have more nudity on the TV but we have less violence during prime time. Nudity here is a none issue, its just a fact of life, there is not sexual meaning of it.

Here we can pay alot and get Sky Satelite TV or to watch movies in English on Cable. I don't do either. I rent movies from my local store or just buy a DVD if we have extra from our living budget one month. Here DVD's usually come in around 4-5 languages to choose from.

The TV shows are going to be most of the same ones you watch with a few locals ones mixed in. We also have Survivors and what nots over here just with our people instead. In Germany, we are always a season behind though, I guess to make sure it was successful and time for translation. I used to watch a lot of TV from the Netherlands. They had quite a bit that was original language, but we can't get it anymore. Bummer.

The atmosphere is Europe does change slightly from country to country but here Ireland is known as the friendliest. Actually, Ireland as far as I know are some of the friendliest worldwide. Go figure.

I do in fact have a half fridge but they are getting harder to come by in Germany. They aren't as big as Americans by far but a great many are 5 foot tall now.

Milk takes some time to get used to. Yes you can buy fresh, refrigerated kind but you can also get long shelf life milk and cream. Sits in your cabinets.

We have refund bottles, not sure about Ireland though. So all pop and such you have to deposit 25cents and then get it back when you return the bottle.

I am also a member of the "American Womens Club of Duesseldorf". This is a necessity for my sanity some days. I know that they do have one in Dublin at least. My point here is there are many International groups that help people who are trying to cope with other cultures.

Ok, since Hubby says I am writing a book, I will stop. I would say living overseas is not for everyone but it is a great experience if your flexible and open to changes.
 

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I absolutely love the Irish people (used to date one of them a LONG time ago).

Ireland is 'quainter' than the US (no offence intended), VERY friendly people (personally I find Americans equally friendly), absolutely steeped in history but if you decide to move to a small place in Ireland then expect that everything is at a slower pace than in the US.

Regarding rain, it is all a matter of what you are used to.
Ireland is a green country - lush green countryside - because of the rain.
 

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Regarding the TV.
We had American neighbors for a while and they managed to get a satelite hook-up via the US military (he was in a logisitics unit in Holland) and enjoyed all of their usual programs. I don't remember how they did it, but it is possible.
 

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I absolutely love the Irish people (used to date one of them a LONG time ago).

Ireland is 'quainter' than the US (no offence intended), VERY friendly people (personally I find Americans equally friendly), absolutely steeped in history but if you decide to move to a small place in Ireland then expect that everything is at a slower pace than in the US.

Regarding rain, it is all a matter of what you are used to.
Ireland is a green country - lush green countryside - because of the rain.
yes, there are no 24 hour a day anything in ireland. the grocery store opens when the owner feels like it and shows up. all business stops at 5 pm and woe unto those who have not completed their business, including shopping, by 5. most people dash for groceries during their lunch hour.
 

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Freebie Queen
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Discussion Starter #12
yes. queue jumping is the national sport of london.
I'm not sure I could get used to that, lol, I can't stand those type of people! Line Jumpers.

We are used to things being slower because of where we live, our stores close around 5pm and that includes weekend and that is more our type of living than when we were in the big cities.

We are looking on the western side of Ireland, county Mayo, that area. We want to be away from the big towns but not so much that we can't drive when we need to. I wouldn't mind living just outside of town (smaller) and be able to ride a bike into town etc. We are also looking for somewhere that would keep our interests more so than the kids because they are growing older and probably would not want to spend the time with us there. We could possibly retire there full time? I wonder how retirement is there?

You know as I was reading the posts, I really don't watch all that much tv so it's not like I'm worried about not being able to watch any tv, I watch more of public tv than anything and we have a lot of channels, I just don't like tv all that much, I guess it's just more of being used to something, kwim.

I thought house prices in Ireland were cheaper than what I have been seeing on the internet, I guess it's the same as here, certain area's are higher than others and the prices run from so much to so much. I'm glad to hear that Irelander's (hmmm, what would they be called?) are nice people, I always thought they would be :) I have always heard from people I know who have traveled abroad how nice people are over in Europe. Except for one certain country, I won't name any names, Merci beaucoup ;)

How would I get some things over there? I wouldn't take alot but I would need to bring somethings?
 

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Hi Rangia,

Do you mean you can't get Dutch telly anymore?
Some series etc. can be viewed via internet, see www.uitzendinggemist.nl or for example www.rtl4.nl I guess you need to figure out which channel shows what and what their website is.The tag 'gemist' will lead you to the video possibilities. hth!
 

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How would I get some things over there? I wouldn't take alot but I would need to bring somethings?

we rented a furnished flat. all we brought were our clothes. we were there for a year.
 

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We are looking on the western side of Ireland, county Mayo, that area. We want to be away from the big towns but not so much that we can't drive when we need to. I wouldn't mind living just outside of town (smaller) and be able to ride a bike into town etc. We are also looking for somewhere that would keep our interests more so than the kids because they are growing older and probably would not want to spend the time with us there. We could possibly retire there full time? I wonder how retirement is there?

uh, back up. you can go for a short time if sponsored by a company or military. you can go if you are in a profession with a high demand such as nursing, medical doctor or engineer. you can't "just move" there. You can't retire there, unless you are independently wealthy, like madonna "with no recourse to public funds".

look up the VISA and immigration points system.

sorry to rain on your parade, but their socialist healthcare system and unemployment problems cannot handle anyone moving there, taking jobs away from citizens.
 

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QUOTE "sorry to rain on your parade, but their socialist healthcare system and unemployment problems cannot handle anyone moving there, taking jobs away from citizens. " END QUOTE

hmmm...sounds like THEY have it right.
 
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Didi, thanks for the links, much appreciated. We used to have a satellite dish that we had coded for the Dutch channels (rtl's, veronica, and the basics free things) but we moved to NZ and back so we no longer have it.



I cringe at the word immigration anymore; mine to Germany wasn't bad since I am married to an German but going to NZ wasn't fun.
 

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Freebie Queen
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No, we wouldn't retire there, (perhaps it wasn't written like I meant it to come out) I was just thinking out loud, you know that they always list "places to retire to" but it's usually somewhere on the beach type of place. I haven't really heard of places in Europe where they list as one of those retirement places.

When you own farm land, you can rent it out and make enough to live a very comfortable life on the rent payment you received, we own enough to make that happen, just not as of yet though. I never checked into the visa's yet just because it's just a thought at this time.

When you moved (either for a long period of time or short) did you learn the language of the country you lived in? I thought I would try to learn Gaelic (sp?) at least to make decent conversation if needed. I can't complain about people learning to speak english here if I'm not going to at least try to learn where ever it is we live a few months out of the year, whether that would be Gaelic, Italian, French or for that matter Russian :)
 

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I can answer many questions as I am sure the others can too. However, I am concerned though that you have not even looked at Visa's yet. I think you may be getting your hopes up high. Most places in Europe will require you to be sponsored by a company with a certain amount of income depending upon what career it is. If you looking at a business visa, the amount of capital you are required to have will be large. We have a lot of countries joining the EU with that a lot of migration going on, so immigration has seen some overhauling in the last few years.

It took us 2 years to get approved to NZ, the application processes wait alone was 9-10 months, just so they can say we have prospect as migrants and now they will need medicals, criminal reports, employment history, contact details and so forth and so forth and so forth.


As far as the language, I didn't know a word till I was here but then I registered in several German classes. That was in 1998, my German still sucks.
 

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Freebie Queen
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We haven't really looked up any visa regulations because it would probably a good while before we would purchase a part time home, we are just weighing our options of where we would think we would like to go, if because of visa rules and we can't move to Ireland then we will remove that from our wish list and move on to the next one. Perhaps I should look into the visa's sooner than later :)

I think when you sit there and watch shows like House Hunters International, I have seen some of the shows where they move to like France, but there is no job involved? But I'm grateful for everyones input just because we have no experience with the rules and regulations of living overseas.

When you travel for vacation oversea's, I always assumed you can just head over there (anywhere) as long as you have a passport? Is that part correct? It's funny, but we have lived in almost all area's in the states because of my dh's job, but it's a much bigger world out there.
 
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