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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1940..Social Circle GA...Walton Mill Village. Mrs. Kirk made candy, put it in small paper sacks, and came house-to-house visiting and selling the candy for five cents a bag.

The candy was somewhat like a soft sidewalk chalk...pastel colored, various flavors, no nuts. Not as soft as a divinity, but much softer than peanut brittle...even textured...no coarse sugar crystals.

I've tried to duplicate the candy, and the closest I can get is a divinity that I let dry out. That gives a texture that isn't quite right...a little tougher than I recall.
Of course, I was seven years old at that time, and time does ripen memories and improves flavor and quality.

Any ideas and suggested recipes??

Old Jimmus: 75 years old, still learning, still trying, still searching. Most recent lesson: A baking stone for the oven is a good addition.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ceashels, thank you for your suggestions..

I've thought of trying some seafoam which seems to be much like divinity to me. The recipes I've seen in my cookbooks list brown sugar as the ingredient, and I've thought that the result might be like a very foamy peanut brittle minus the peanuts.

I'll try some seafoam soon. // -j
 

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I know what you're referring too, we have it in a store at a historical village. I love the stuff. It's delicious. I'll see if I can find a recipe there if youlike.
 

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Isn't it called rock candy?
 

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Jimmus,

If it the candy I'm thinking it's called Edinburgh Rock Candy.

Traditional Scottish Recipes
- Edinburgh Rock

The rock on which Edinburgh Castle stands is volcanic and very hard. But the confection "Edinburgh Rock" is (or should be) very soft and crumbly. Many millions of boxes of Edinburgh Rock are sold to sweet-toothed tourists (and locals) every year.



Ingredients:
One pound (450g or 2 cups) sugar lumps (loaf sugar)
Quarter pint (150ml or two-thirds cup) water
Quarter teaspoon (1.5ml) cream of tartar
Green and yellow food colouring and peppermint and lemonflavouring
Some oil for greasing
Method:
Using a heavy-base saucepan, heat the water and sugar gently until all the sugar has dissolved. Bring this almost to the boil and then stir in the cream of tartar. Boil until the mixture has reached 120C or 250F (use a sugar thermometer or boil until a teaspoon of the mixture can form a hard ball when it is dropped into a cup of cold water).

Using two separate heatproof bowls, pour half the mixture into each bowl. Stir in the green food colouring into one and the yellow colouring into the other to create a delicate shade of each colour. Add a few drops of peppermint flavouring to the green one and lemon flavouring to the yellow one, mixing well.

Oil two shallow baking tins (pan) and pour each of the mixtures into the separate tins. Using an oiled knife, turn the edges towards the centre as they begin to cool. When the mixture is cool enough to handle, pull and fold the mixture. Finally, pull into a long log shape, about ½ inch (1 cm) in diameter. Cut into shorter sticks with scissors. Spread on a sheet of non-stick baking parchment and leave for over 24 hours. Store in an airtight container.



Or search there are variations of the recipe. HTH. I have to make some now..lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Great help, mommy4ever...thanks...

Jimmus,

If it the candy I'm thinking it's called Edinburgh Rock Candy.

Traditional Scottish Recipes
- Edinburgh Rock

The rock on which Edinburgh Castle stands is volcanic and very hard. But the confection "Edinburgh Rock" is (or should be) very soft and crumbly. Many millions of boxes of Edinburgh Rock are sold to sweet-toothed tourists (and locals) every year.

(snip)

i'll try this recipe. It sound more like our recipes for "saltwater taffy" than anything else that comes to mind.

i'm about 40mi N of Atlanta GA USA, and saltwater taffy is sold widely over the country in touristy location...seacoast, Florida, Great Smokey Mt. Nation Park, etc. I love it....many different flavors.

I like Edinburgh...lovely city...but I enjoy moving on to the likes of Arrochar and Tarbet... :) // jimmus
 

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Jimmus, I thought it would be like saltwater too, but once it sets it's hard and chalky, I buy it locally at an historicalvillage.

I tried it out, it is a a chalky candy stick or chunk if you cut it. my first batch turned out great..lol. The second batch... well something didn't work.

It's not a taffy at all, sounds like taffy because you pull it but it gets like a stick of sidewalk chalk, but you pull it until it becomes dull, roll it into the log, cut to length and let set 24 to 48 hours for full set. Voila! Toute fini!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
mommy4ever, thank you for your information.

i'll give the recipe a try in about a week, and i'll let you know how my rock rolls...does sound good and fun to make.

will be back in contact around monday week. jimmus
 
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