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I plan to take the children on many camping trips this summer, I love to take them on trail walks and collect animal tracks by pouring plaster into them and collecting them on the return walk.... I would like to try some new things. Denise (Sunshine) posted about making pine needle tea, I have looked up many articles on it and it is very rich in vitamin C..... I am going to try this one, I am going to make cattail torches also..... any other ideas???????? Things easily identified ........... TIA
 

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How about wildflower identification? Could have them press some to observe or craft later.

Birdwatching is fun too.

I also think letting them have disposable cameras to take their own pictures builds wonderful memories.
 

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I made some nature guides for them and they have binoculars.... (Good ones) I made nature packs for them, they have a snack, large tweezers and specimen bottles for collecting things, dry plaster in bags, whistles, bug spray, small firstaid kit in an empty med bottle, water bottles to hang around their necks, baby wipes in a baggy, bug repel., sun screen, compass, trash bags, flash light, rubberbands, ect, ect..... and we each take a nice walking stick.... I have taught them some survival skills, I think the flowers will be great fun... Thanks Sara
 

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I love the bird watching one.

How about rock collecting. Find a great rock book and let them identify the rocks they find.

Do you have butterflies in your area? This is another fascinating study, they can identify them, see where they travel from to get to your area in the summer, etc.

For pioneering, you can have them make a pioneer meal, flapjacks come to mind. Also if you have wild roses, they could make something with rosehips.
 

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Drop spindle spinning?

drying fruits and vegetables without an electric dehyrator?

make lye soap?

Hand sewing, quilting, knit, crochet. . . .

How about cutting up your own chicken? So many people these days don't know how to cut up meat. Just buy a whole chickekn and let them cut it into the proper pieces- I'm guessing they are capable of handling knives.

Have you taken them to New Salem when they have special days? How about to Arthur and Rockhome gardens? Lewis and Clark college has wonderful Pioneer days in the fall and the river festivals later in the summer usually have lots of Pioneer/blackpowder days too.
 

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Get a couple of those Foxfire books from your library, they have tons and tons of great ideas.

I agree with rock hunting. Dd has a collection she builds on every year for 4-H.
 

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http://wings.interfree.it/html/main.html Homemade stoves- useful for camping or survival practice.

http://www.kidsgardening.com/HYDROPONICSGUIDE/hydro7-3.asp Grow plants in 2 liter soda bottles.

http://www.kurtsaxon.com/ The survival foods link is great.

http://www.geocities.com/willsmama98/PioneerCrafts.html Pioneer crafts for kids.

http://www.bumblebeeee.com/free_pattern_links.htm free patterns for baskets, quilts, carving and much more. Some might work for what you are wanting to do.

Oh! Solar cooking- have them make a solar oven out of a cardboard box. Try www.solarcooking.org

http://www.homestead.com/peaceandcarrots/links.html

www.42explore.com/pioneer.html lots of links for various activites- set up for educators.

Johnny cake in rhyme
Two cups Indian (cornmeal), one cup wheat;
One cup good eggs that you can eat.
One-half cup molasses too,
One big spoon sugar added thereto;
Salt and soda, each a small spoon.
Mix up quickly and bake it soon.

Togus bread
A steamed pudding similar to Boston Brown Bread.

Three cups of sweet milk, one cup of sour,
Three cups of Indian meal, one cup of flour,
OF soda sufficient a teaspoon to fill,
The same of salt and season it well.
A cup of molasses will make it quite sweet,
And a very gtood dish for a Yankee to eat.

(Steam three hours)

*Note: "Indian Meal" referred to cornmeal in pre-20th century cookbooks.


I'll keep going through my favorites and old cookbooks- will post more later.
 

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Hoe Cake w/saying
Get up Old Man,
Day is breakin
fires in the stove
Hoe Cake is bakin

Pour 8 TBS of water over 3 cups of "yaller" corn meal, adding 1 tsp of salt and 2 TBS melted butter. Mix well, place in a greased bread pan or baking dish and bake at 350' for a good half-hour. Serve hot with crisp bacon curls all over the top and plenty of Ozark sorghum.


Tomato pudding
1 ( 15 oz) can tomato puree
3 cups of bread cubes, tightly packed
1 1/2 cups brown sugar
3/4 c. butter

Melt the butter and add the bread cubes. Mix the tomato puree and sugar and cook for five minutes. combine the tomato mixture and bread cubes in a one-quartt casserole and bake in a 350 degree oven for 45 minutes.

__________________


Squirrel Pot Pie with Buttermilk Biscuit Dumplings

3 gray or fox squirrels, about 3 pounds, dressed, cut into serving-size pieces
1/2 cup all-purpose flour, plus 1 tablespoon
3 tablespoons butter
4 cups Homemade Chicken Broth or water
1 onion, chopped
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
Buttermilk Biscuit Dumplings (recipe follows)

Dredge meat in 1/2 cup of the flour. Melt 2 tablespoons of the butter in a large Dutch oven and saute the squirrel pieces until brown. Add the stock or water adn the onions, salt, and pepper. Cover tightly and simmer over low heat until the squirrel meat is tender, about 1 hour.

Meanwhile, make the dumpling dough, roll it out, and cut out rounds.

After the squirrel meat is tender, remove lid and lay biscuit rounds over the squirrel. Cover again and boil for 15 minutes. Transfer dumplings and meat to a heated platter and set in a warm place. Melt the remaining 1 tablespoon of butter and blend it with the remaining 1 tablespoon of flour. Add to the liquid in the Dutch oven, blending well to make a gravy; cook about 5 minutes more. Pour gravy over meat and dumplings.

Makes 6-8 servings.

Buttermilk Biscuit Dumplings

2 cups all-purpose flour, plus flour for rolling out dough
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 cup pork lard or butter
1 cup old buttermilk or sour (blinky) milk

Mix together the flour, baking powder, salt and baking soda. Cut in the lard with a fork or pastry blender or rub it in with your hands until the mixture is fine grained and well blended. Stir in the buttermilk, just until well blended; do not overmix. Turn the dough ionto a floured surface and knead lightly and quickly. Then roll out about 1/4 inch thick and cut into rounds with a biscuit cutter. Cook as directed in the above recipe. Makes enough dumplings for 1 pot pie.

http://www.williamrubel.com/magicoffire/openhearthindex.html Cooking over a hearth

Doughnuts in rhyme
One cup sugar, one cup milk
Two eggs beaten fine as silk.

Salt and nutmeg (lemon will do)
Of baking powders teaspoons two

Gently stir the flour in
Roll on pie board not too thin

Cut in diamonds, twists or rings
Drop with care the doughy things

Into fat that swiftly swells
Evenly the spongy cells

Watch with care the fire for turning
Fry them brown, just short of burning

Roll in sugar, serve when cool
This a never failing rule.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
WOW !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
What great friends !!!!!!!
We are going to have the best time camping this year !
Thanks Bunches !!!!!!!!!!
 
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