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Discussion Starter #1
I got a wonderful large HEAVY cast iron skillet
from Cabella's for Christmas this year. I know
how to season it, but first I need to remove
the protective coating that is on it.

Lots of hits on Google said I could use very
hot water and steel wool. I have some very
fine steel wool pads, but also have SOS pads
which are steel wool. Some articles said to
not use steel wool.

Has anyone used either of these to remove
the coating on new cast iron and does this
method work pretty well?

Thanks!
 

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I've looked at the cast iron skillets at Cabela's (the one store that hubby and I both love...lol) and I did not realize they had a protective coating. Am interested in learning more about this and how it's removed for future reference.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Lucky,
This was on the Mother Earth News site:

All new cast iron has a protective coating on it, which must be removed. American companies use a special food-safe wax; imports are covered with a water-soluble shellac. In either case, scrub the item with a scouring pad, using soap and the hottest tap water you can stand. Once the coating is removed, you should never again let soap touch the iron.
 

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Lucky,
This was on the Mother Earth News site:

All new cast iron has a protective coating on it, which must be removed. American companies use a special food-safe wax; imports are covered with a water-soluble shellac. In either case, scrub the item with a scouring pad, using soap and the hottest tap water you can stand. Once the coating is removed, you should never again let soap touch the iron.
Thanks Surilda, this is very good to know!
 

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Either steel wool or SOS pads will work. I used SOS a lot when I had to clean the pans as a kid. Regular scouring with steel wool or SOS pads will also smooth out the cooking surface with time, giving you a better seasoned finish.

Soap is not a problem on the cast iron. I've been scrubbing iron pans since the 70's and using soap. What you NEVER want to do is let one soak in water. It will rust. And then you have to scrub it really hard to get it clean again.

Also a good idea to not cook tomato based foods, as the acid will strip your seasoned finish.
 
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