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Our doggy is having trouble walking. She's been tested and the vets can't find anything specific wrong with her. Mostly they're diagnosing old age. She's about twelve, we think. We've always thought, and our vet has thought, that she has had a spinal injury in the past before we got her, and now she has probably developed arthritis, which is contributing to her current health issues.

I've been reading about the use of glucosamine for treating joint pain and inflammation in dogs and it sounds like something worth trying.

Does anyone have any experience with Osteo Biflex or other glucosamine products, either through using it yourself or using it for a pet? I'm just wondering if it's as good as the hype suggests.

If you've used it yourself with success, what has been the progression as you've felt better? How long did it take to see significant improvement?

We tried Rimadyl for our doggy and she had bad side effects, although luckily no liver damage. But that stuff caused her bad pain. So we're hoping for a safer, effective alternative.
 

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Our previous old girl was on dasuquin for her arthritic joints and it did make a difference. We could definitely tell the difference within a week when we ran out of it one time.

I would check with your vet to see if the human equivalent of the meds would benefit your girl.
 

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Warning: I have no pets nor have any experience using this and am not suggesting this but it could be worth something worth researching?

What I've heard/read was that you can use the same glucosamine supplement that humans use on your pets for their joints. You don't need to buy the overpriced 'pet' versions. But there is a certain way to scale down the human supplements into smaller safer doses for the animals.
 

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Thanks. I have the dosage by weight and will be checking with my vet later today to make sure. The advice I've read online is also to double the dose for the first two weeks and then scale it back.

I will be using the human version since I can get it in town so my doggy can start it right away. Also because if it doesn't work for her, then we can use it too so it does not go to waste.
 

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I use the glucosamine/chondroiton/MSM mix tablet. It really helps out my knee and my shoulders. If I forget to take my supplements for a few days, I really feel it.




Side note:
Sorry about the spelling, the bottle is buried deep in my pill drawer and it would take too long to dig it out.
 

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Years ago we had one of our cats on glucosamine, it was over the counter, a capsule. We opened it up and sprinkled half of it over her food twice a day. It seemed to really help her joints.
Hope it helps your dog.
 

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I just spoke to one of our vets. We've decided to try an oral steroid for a few days and see if that helps. She thought the glucosamine was a hit or miss affair, and that it was most helpful for animals whose problems were more minor than our girl's current condition.

But I'm still interested in hearing about any experiences people have had.

Vet just called back and said she was going to put our doggy on a pain med, too.

I sure hope these new drugs help her. She can't go on the way she is. It's too hard on all of us, most of all her.
 

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a few days of a steroid can make a big difference. Glucosamine and oxychondrioton work as non steroidal anti-inflammatories as well and are for longer term usage. I take them as well.

When Precious was on the Dasuquin, she was at a higher dose the first week as well.
 

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I just hope the new drugs don't make things worse, like the Rimadyl did. The last thing we want to do is start torturing her again with medication.
 

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I've tried it for myself, especially after I had my surgery on my right shoulder and the doctor recommended it for the inflammation. It works really, really well. I wouldn't go overboard with the expensive stuff. The stock material (the non-flashy version) is just as good as the name-brand stuff.
 

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Glucosamine Chondroitin for dogs

I've used glucosamine chondroitin in several of my dogs with mixed results. The vet told me to give 2 tablets twice a day for the first 30 days - if it seemed to be helping to continue at one tablet a day. If there was no noticable change, then I should quit.

It has worked really well for Frances for years - she's a 45# cattle dog mix that I got when she was about 1. She dislocated one hip somehow at about 5 years of age. X-rays showed that she had buckshot in one hip & the other looked like she had been hit by a car when younger. The vet sedated her, put her hip back in its socket & told me that she might need hip surgery in the future. She's 11 now (though she tells everyone she is 3) & has been on G/C for 6+ years. Occassionally she'll favor one rear leg, but overall she does well.

My chow/shepherd mix on the other hand has arthritis in one shoulder & the G/C made no difference at all. He's now on 1/2 a Previcox once a day & has some Tramadol for very bad days. The painkillers are cheap, but the Previcox is pretty pricey.

I buy my glucosamine at Aldi - it's the best price I've found. I always give it with food - mostly because if I take it on an empty stomach it gives me heartburn - I don't want my dog to get heartburn:)

I hope your baby is feeling better soon. The steroids will often do wonders in a very short time.
 

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Well, we managed to get the new drugs mixed up so Sparky just started the steroids today. She's been getting the Tramadol since Friday. The steroid is Prednisone. We should know in a few days if it's going to help. Our vet said it may not make much difference, but that sometimes the two drugs together work wonders. Let's hope for that last one.
 

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I have our dog, 16 pounds on the glucosamine chondroitin mix for dogs. She's been on it for about 6 months. We could tell a difference in less than 3 days. If I run out of it she starts having trouble walking with back left leg and hips in about a week. I swear by the stuff and get it at Pet Supermarket. A 2 month supply for her size is $20. And yes, the first couple weeks are double dose then only 1 for her size.
I did a lot of reading online before I started her on it. Here's a couple of the websites I used.

Glucosamine & Chondroitin for Hip Dysplasia & Arthritis in Dogs

Remedies for Arthritis in Dogs: Glucosamine, Chondroitin Sulfate, Steroids, and NSAIDs | petMD

Steroids
Prednisone, Dexamethasone, and other corticosteroids will markedly reduce swelling and inflammation to affected joints. But there is a downside to the use of steroids for long-term palliation of arthritis: they can can actually contribute to additional joint damage and breakdown.
 

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I think it's doubtful Sparky will live long enough for the steroids to cause her problems. Right now, we're worried about the next month. If her current drugs don't help, we will have to make the hard decision and end her suffering.
 

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Oh man, I'm so sorry. The difference in Britany being on and off this is difference of day and night. I swear.
I don't envy you. I'm so sorry.
 

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I hope the steroids help. I have my dog, Chewy, on human glucosamine products, based on the recommendation of my vet. (The difference in price between human and pet glucosamine makes it a lot more frugal to use the human stuff.) My vet told me that the "adult" dosage for humans for most meds is based on a 150-pound person, so you can adjust the dosage accordingly, depending on your dog's weight. Most glucosamine supplements suggest giving twice the RDA for a week or two, to build up the levels in your system. Also, many people and pets don't experience the full benefits for a couple of weeks, and if you stop giving them for a few days, you are back to square one.

Keep in mind also that you shouldn't give glucosamine to an animal with any issues related to blood sugar. (My donkeys, for example, have a thyroid issue that makes them not tolerate high blood sugar levels, so I can't give them anything with glucosamine in it.) You can still give MSM and chondroitin, though, as well as green lipped mussel. I have not been able to find any combo joint supplement that doesn't contain glucosamine, so I buy my ingredients singly at the feed store, where you can get large buckets of each and mix at your own ratio.

Chewy, my dysplastic Chow, experienced a lot of relief from the following: ultrasound therapy (at the vet); glucosamine supplements (and yes, I use Osteo-Biflex for him at 1/4 tab twice daily); and losing weight.
 

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Thanks, MH. I'm starting to think our other dog might benefit from this supplement, so this thread is still relevant and helpful and I'm glad I started it. Our other doggy, Sugar, isn't showing any signs of stiffness or joint pain and we'd like to keep it that way. Thanks, everyone, for your helpful input.

Sparky seems marginally better, which is a good sign. She doesn't cry as much when she tries to get up, seems to be able to get up a little easier on our slippery floors, and isn't laying curled up tight in what seemed to be a position of pain. She's laying stretched out flat more often now. She's also started turning in circles before laying down again, which she has always done till recently. Her head is up more often and she listens more attentively to figure out what's going on around her. She is blind so walks with her head down, but recently didn't lift her head when being petted or when standing still.

We somehow got the meds confused so she has only had about three doses of the steroids. We're not doing the happy dance yet but we're cautiously hopeful because she does seem a bit better.

It will be interesting to see what happens this week. She's at an age where we know her time with us is limited regardless, but we don't want to let her go until we have to.
 

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Glad to hear that Sparky is starting to feel better. Here's hoping for better days.

I also wanted to add, another NSAID that some dogs tolerate better than rimadyl is Metacam (meloxicam) it's given once per day, liquid form. It still has a long retention time in the body which stinks, (you still have to do a washing out period when stopping it) but for some, it's the only thing that they can give for anti-inflammatory.

another up and comer for joint supplements is Hyaluronic Acid. It's a glycosaminoglycan and is distributed among the connective tissues and neural tissues. If I recall correctly, it's been big in the horse world for a while, but theyve recently starting using it in humans and small pets.
A few friends and I bought a gallon of HylaRX for horses and split the gallon among the 4 of us. I think we gave a teaspoon per day for loading and then a 1/2 teaspoon per day after that. The stuff lasted a long time and well worth the $15 for my share. I had to stop giving it because of the medications that Yardman is on. Fuzzy prefers a joint tablet that has it in it, so I don't give it to her and Marco is on Dasuquin and given his young age, I'd like to keep something in my bag of tricks to add to his supplementation as he gets older.
 
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