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I'm teaching two sections of non-credit chemistry at a local community college this semester. The primary customer of these classes are pre-nursing students taking the class due to a deficiency in High School chemistry.

I know there are a few practicing nurses here. What are the really important things you want your future coleagues to take home from this class? Things that they will either need to know down cold for their actual nursing classes or things you want them to at least know how to re-learn in 2 - 3 years when they start practicing.

How often are nurses expected to record and/or verify lot numbers of medicines that they dispense?

Thanks!
 

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Record and verify lot numbers of medicines. . . .

for all flu, pneumonia vaccines, blood type products like albumin, uhm . . . I know I'm forgetting some.
 

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hmm my nursing classes were in early 80s- i basically remember my chem teacher being hard to follow and jumping from place to place in a made no sense to anyone but her - way so i basically taught myself reading what we were supposed to be learning while i sat in the back of the class - Got an A so it worked LOL

i do homecare now so about all i check are exp dates on meds as far as what you are asking .

so much i do now i just do because i always have, so i cant pinpoint anything chem wise although i am sure there are a ton of things knowledge wise etc that goes back to chem as its base.


sorry i am of no help LOL
 

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Are you teaching organic chemistry or inorganic? I had to take a semester of each, and to be honest, I don't use a lot of either in my practice. I think chemistry was a course that was included in the nursing curriculum to separate the sheep from the goats. The most valuable aspect of inorganic chemistry, in my opinion, was learning how to set up a problem and solve for x. I know this is really a math issue, but it is a vital skill for dosage calculation. In organic chemistry, I think the most valuable aspect of the course was the biochemistry, especially the Krebs cycle, which came up again and again in microbiology, physiology, etc. It was also helpful for reading the Physician's Desk Reference, which provides chemical compositions of all medications. Having had organic, I have some idea of what they are talking about. Hope this helps!
 

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I just thought of something else -- and understanding of acid-base balance is critical nursing knowledge. It comes up all the time, especially in the treatment of diabetes, renal diseases, and COPD.
 

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I am a current nursing student and took chem about two years ago. Maybe it's been the long summer break, but I'm having a hard time even remembering what I learned in that class, lol! Must have been something bc I pulled out with an A. Anyways, the two that can to mind for me have been mentioned. These students are going to need to be very comfortable with the equations present in this class, they will be using all the time for dosage calculations. My school had a dosage calc quiz the first semester that you had to get at least a 95%. You could retake twice and if you didn't pass, you are out of the program.

Also, understanding the acid-base balance and buffers is really important as well. Pharmacology, med-surg, diabetes management, patho; all of these classes have covered this info, but it is expected that you understand the basics.
 
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