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Discussion Starter #1
I wonder if you'd mind answering some silly questions for me?

1. What do Irish children call their grandparents, aunts/uncles, etc.? (If the words are Gaelic, could you give the pronunciation, too, please?)

2. Do most people in Ireland speak mostly Gaelic, English, or both?

DH and I are both third-generation Irish-Americans, and we're planning our first trip to Ireland in the winter. We're very curious about the everyday things we can't learn about in the books.

Thanks in advance!
 

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I'm just responding to "bump" your post, Eidelweiss for Scattymum to see. I do believe, though, that English is the primary language in Ireland. Gaelic is considered something of a "dead" language, although many in Ireland do know how to speak it. BTW, I'm Irish on both my mom and dad's sides, but my ancestors settled Texas long ago in the early 1800's. (WAY back!:) )


--Michelle
 

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bumping again, because i'd like to learn too!
 

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I wonder if you'd mind answering some silly questions for me?

1. What do Irish children call their grandparents, aunts/uncles, etc.? (If the words are Gaelic, could you give the pronunciation, too, please?)

2. Do most people in Ireland speak mostly Gaelic, English, or both?

DH and I are both third-generation Irish-Americans, and we're planning our first trip to Ireland in the winter. We're very curious about the everyday things we can't learn about in the books.

Thanks in advance!
Hi there, sorry ive took so long to respond - i have not been here for a while as life has taken over!

the kids call me mummy, or mum although many kids use the term mammy/mam, grandparents are usually granny/nana and granddad/grandpa.

as the previous poster said English is our primary language although Gaelic (Irish) is not what i would term a *dead language*

It is spoken quite a lot, in school it is a compulsary lesson from age 4-5 upwards. my kids go to an english speaking school but most towns have a Gaelscoil ( gay-ol- sch -ol) which all the lessons are taught in Irish and english is not spoken.

also around the country are pockets of complete irish speaking towns.

all road signs, town signs, bus signs etc are in Irish and English.

we dont speak that much in Irish at home but more so English interspersed with Irish words

please - mas e do thoil ( mosh - ey - du - holl - ay)
thank you - go raibh maith agut ( guh - ra - mah - a - gut)
goodbye - Slan ( sl-ar-n)

i will say things like
its time to go to the leaba (la-va) (bed)

where abouts in Ireland are you visiting? - it will be pretty cold and rainy in winter!

any other questions please ask!
 

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This was fun. Do we need an Irish-descent kith? Sounds like there are a few of us. I always wonder how much of what I think I know about Ireland is real, and how much is hype - but I like playing with it anyway, and my son is quite into it.
 

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Wow! See you learn something new everyday. Thanks, Scattymum, for giving us that very interesting lesson on Ireland and the Gaelic language. Very cool!:)


--Michelle
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yikes - I'm the one who wanted to know and then I disappeared and forgot about it for a while!

Thanks, Scattymum, for the lesson. I find other cultures fascinating.

We are headed, officially, to Dublin, Killarney, Limerick, etc. Since it's our first visit, we want to see all the "touristy" stuff. I NEED to kiss the Blarney Stone, although my husband says I'm full enough of blarney already. DH wants to do the Guinness tour. We know it will be cold, but I understand that everything stays green year-round, so I'm ok with it.

Thanks again for the info!
 

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LOL, im always dissappering myself!

you sound like you are going to have a great time, Dublin is great and so much to see, you can get a city tour bus which isnt that expensive which will take you round the city and point out places of interest and a bit of history - you can buy a day ticket and hop on/ hop off the bus kind of thing, Dublin is not that big so you will be able to see quite alot by walking around.

The guiness factory is good, your entrance fee also includes a free half pint in the sky bar ( very cool bar - its all glass and you can see the whole city from up there.

Killarney is one of our very favourite places to go - the town is quite small but very nice and the scenery is amazing - especially if you drive round the ring of Kerry, its a fabulous part of Ireland!

we went to Blarney a few years ago - im sure you dont want to know but the blarney stone is actually part of a medieval toilet!!! - its a fun thing to do though!

If you get a chance then come to my county Wicklow - its called *the garden of Ireland*, beautiful mountains and coast.

I hope you have a wonderful trip!
 

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My husband is from Dublin. He says the zoo and museums there are wonderful.
 
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