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Thought of a neat thread idea.

I'm always looking for something new for the garden and with so much to choose from, it's hard to find the time to do the research. So, my challenge to you is this:

Teach me about a plant in your garden. Take a picture this year or use an old one of any plant in your garden and teach me about it. It can be a flower, a vegetable, a shrub or anything growing in your garden.
Do some research on line or in books and include everything needed to grow that plant. Include such things as soil conditions, light, watering habits, what zone it grows best in, etc etc etc...

Please remember to put how much a plant spreads... :gaah: dang Black eyed Susans.
 

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I am going to jump right in here.
For the past several years here in Bartow, Fla., the city has landscaped the medians and sides of the road with a grass that had pink, feathery blooms on them. I fell in love with it but did not know what it was called. I have finally found it and purchased some for my yard. It is called:
Muhly Grass or Muhlenbergia capillaris.
It requires:
Light: Full Sun
Soil Moisture: Low to high
It is a native Florida plant
Drought tolerance is high
Growth rate: medium
Mature height: 2-5 feet
Mature spread: 2-3 feet
Soil texture: sandy
Soil pH: Slightly acidic, slighty alkaline to alkaline
Salt tolerance: high
Hardiness Zone: 8-11

Since I do not have an irrigation system for my yard and with the fact that Florida has become very dry in the Spring and Summer, I have replaced most of the plants in my front yard with drought tolerant plants. I am becoming more proud of my front plant bed.
 

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Help me Russ, I can't get the pictures to post.
 

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A stiff, upright annual or shortlived perennial native to the eastern United States, but has become endemic throughout North America. The Black-Eyed Susan is probably the most common of all American wildflowers. The characteristic brown, domed center is surrounded by bright yellow ray florets. Thrives in most soils in full sun. A true sunshine worshiper that forgives neglect.

Average planting success with this species: 80%
Height: 2-3 feet
Germination: 7-30 days
Optimum soil temperature for germination: 70F
Sowing depth: 1/16"
Blooming period: June-August
Average seeds per pound: 1,710,000
Seeding rate: 2 lbs. per acre
Suggested use: Roadsides, open fields, floral gardens, mixtures.
Miscellaneous: The state flower of Maryland. When cut, has a vase life of 6 to 10 days. Reseeds.

When they say it reseeds, they are not kidding! If you plant this near other perennials they WILL crowd them out!
 

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Hope this thread takes off.......would love to learn about new items.

I have a couple in mind........and can still post but I might have lost one...:weeping:........will still research it and can maybe find a pic online....you will just have to trust ;) that it is (?was?) in my garden.

Won't be doing any B E Susans russ.......I have learned that anything that can be considered a 'wildflower' should be read as INVASIVE!!! Coreopsis is another one ---though it doesn't 'crowd' out the plants.....just never stays where you put it........though I like them.
 

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Hope this thread takes off.......would love to learn about new items.

I have a couple in mind........and can still post but I might have lost one...:weeping:........will still research it and can maybe find a pic online....you will just have to trust ;) that it is (?was?) in my garden.

Won't be doing any B E Susans russ.......I have learned that anything that can be considered a 'wildflower' should be read as INVASIVE!!! Coreopsis is another one ---though it doesn't 'crowd' out the plants.....just never stays where you put it........though I like them.
Sorry you will have to bear with me; I have no idea how to post pics, BUT I really liked this snow on the mountain. Variegated light green and cream colored leaves. What a mistake. It has taken over the whole front of my house. You cannot kill it. I have pulled it out ripping it with no mercy; keeps coming back. The only way to totally get rid of it would be to take everything out and put round up on it.
 

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I really like daffodils. I only have 3 different kinds. One I call the plain Jane ones, which I have quite a few. Then I have a small group of minatures. And one lonely light yellow one.
So in my quest to get more on a tight budget here, I decided to ask the Uncle who lives down the road for a few of the bulbs they have. He has a HUGE amount of them around the farm house and along side the road. Quite a few different color variations. I been doing them a lot of favors including extra chicken eggs. I still felt funny about asking for a few plants though.

In doing a search for more info, I came across this site :)
American Daffodil Society
 

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Not sure if you like radishes, but I went to Meijer and they had seeds from a company I didn't recognize sooo, of course, I had to look. I found a seed named watermelon radishes. It looks like an inside out radish. White on the outside and red in the inside.
 

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Sorry you will have to bear with me; I have no idea how to post pics, BUT I really liked this snow on the mountain. Variegated light green and cream colored leaves. What a mistake. It has taken over the whole front of my house. You cannot kill it. I have pulled it out ripping it with no mercy; keeps coming back. The only way to totally get rid of it would be to take everything out and put round up on it.
I TOTALLY agree CP......but lucky enough I didn't have to find out for myself. A friend has it and I saw the problems it created with her yard/garden/other plants..........a horrible species!! But how can it be soooo pretty????
 

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I am going to have to wait from my tree peonies to bloom.....hope they are pretty this year but figure I can post this now.........and I will need help with a hyd. that I have........don't even know what it is called - got a start from my sister's plant and forgot to write down the name.

Gotta say about this posting........mine isn't very pretty this year....so I cheated...I took a pic off the net to post.........I love the shrub though.

Sorry this is so long..........Russ wanted lots of info!!!

Daphne X Burkwoodii (Carol Mackie)
genus name is also common name

Description: semi-evergreen shrub that grows 2 to 3 feet tall X 3 to 4 feet wide or a little bigger but not much.
(It is into winter when mine lose the leaves.) A fairly slow grower.

Carol Mackie has variegated foliage and small white very fragrant flowers. It blooms in May and, depending on the heat at the time, will bloom all month. More mature plants can bloom into June. This is followed later with red berries.

Grows in zones 4 through 8.

Growing conditions: Well drained moist soil - but not soggy. Keep wet during heat.
Excellent drainage is the main key.

Likes neutral PH with lots of humus, and prefers partial sun. (see my comments below on this)

Doesn't spread/take over --totally non-invasive.

Caveat:
Berries and leaves of the plant are claimed to be poisonous.
Supposed to be tough to grow.


My :cents:.......it is not hard to grow as long as you keep the drainage good (no problem with my rocks!!) and keep it watered during the heat of the summer.
I have mine in 'almost' full sun --keep it watered and it is still going strong. It will look a little 'limp' during
the heat ---but it bounces right back in the evening and in the fall (late Aug. -early Sept)when we have cooled off.
It has already bloomed when our serious heat hits so the energy is not being spent on that.

I did put mine in front and my dogs are not allowed in front so I don't have to worry about them eating the berries. (but my dogs leave my plants alone pretty good anyway--- they don't even get into my garden in the back yard and none of it is fenced)

If you like variegated foliage and a very fragrant plant.....and can be safe with the poisonous aspect of it---
I would give this plant a try. The fragrance alone is worth the trouble....but the variegated foliage is an additional
'pop' to your garden.
 
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