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Discussion Starter #1
We often hear about our problems but lets hear about some of the success stories you've had in raising a child/children who have disabilities?
 

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FV Buddy aka Kellie Bob
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My dss rules his mother's house. Her carpets are stained, her walls are colored on and there is a lock on every door, including the refridgerator. In our house, because we provide structure and supervision none of that is the case. He has learned that we have schedules here, he has learned that we have rules and that there are consequences, good or bad for everything he does. Most importantly he has learned that he does not get what he wants by having a temper tantrum and to say yes please and no thank you-all of which makes him more socially acceptable.
 

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This is a mini success story, but I'll share. LOL
My son had issues with bathing. Some may argue it is a typical toddler stage, but I am fairly certain it was a sensory type issue lasting for approximately 8 mos.
It was horrible. It would take Gabe and myself to get him bathed and it was a screaming and kicking terrible experience. I don't know if it was the texture of the tub, the feeling of the water, or even the sound of the tub filling that made him so sensitive, but we finally found something he loved (plastic horses) so we showed him how much the horse loved to swim. This got him to at least stand in the bathtub without screaming. Within a month we could ease him into sitting and I can happily say 50% of the time I can handle bathtime alone now. This is a victory.

Another small success story is shopping. We could not shop, nor could we ever eat out for a looooong time. If it was a five minute in and out thing it was almost ok, but normally consisted of my son lying flat out on the floor of a store total dead weight and screaming. He wouldn't even sit in a cart. It was just horrible. I wouldn't give in and never stopped taking him to stores. I would discuss what we were going to do and tell him what I expected from him and would just keep doing it.
Then one day Tina, (God bless you.) mentioned a store that had the carts with the little cars attached. We finally had a way to shop. He would sit in this little car cart and allow us to push him. Painfree shopping. We then started to call the cart a "ride" and transitioned him to normal shopping carts by calling them "rides". We can now shop normally most of the time without a major scene. This is a victory!

Improvements in these two areas have been so incredible. I recall once thinking pitifully we would never ever be "normal" in public.

Now if we can get his sleep schedule in order~ *sigh*

Sara
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Sara your talking about our Michael (DS). I have tears in my eyes as I read your story because its our son. We still cannot go shopping with him, where he doesn't throw himself on the floor, refuse to walk and screams non-stop. We've gotten to the point where we now have dh and him sit in the car while the rest of us doing the shopping.

Water was the same thing and to this day, we still fight washing his hair.

Successes - yes we've had some with him. When we first got him, he was like a rag doll at 16 mos. Just lay there, doing absolutely nothing. He now does everything except talk. He even works his dad's scroll saw. :)
 

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What might seem like a small accomplishment to some, is HUGE for us! Amanda is wearing big girls underwear! She is potty trained, with only the occasional accident.

This coming from the girl who the doctors swore would never have bowel control. She was supposed to be in diapers for life. So much for doctors :toothy:
 
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