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Discussion Starter #1
I'm not sure where our parents went wrong...lol. But the babyboomers raised kids to have an attitude of entitlement. In turn, these children have raised their own children with even worse attitudes! Is it that the baby boomers had parents that survived the 30's? And did with so little, they felt deprived, so their kids need everything?

Looking at debt ratios today, it is very scary. How can we say North America is so rich? When it's nation is, the majority anyway, living beyound their means? That if they were to lose their job tomorrow, most would dig a hole so deep they wouldn't be able to iget out. It is said, most people live 1 paycheck away from bankruptcy. How scary is that?

I'm not pointing fingers at anyone. I had an attitude of entitlement, and sometimes still do. I'm learning. I want a composter. I had one in my cart, I wanted it NOW. But I talked myself out of it, posted on freecycle, and found one, just need to arrange pick up. Free. Much better.

How do we raise our kids to be frugal, without them getting the attitude that they have been deprived? I'm battling this with ds12 right now. Last year he asked for a Nintendo SP for Christmas last year(2005). We talked about it as there was the Nintendo DS out there already. No, he said he was fine with the SP. Well 3 months later, he wants the DS. I told him, that he had a perfectly fine system that we spend good money on, already. He whined and negotiated, and schemed. Well, in the end he got one :( As he went to his granpa's over spring break and worked with him, and had granpa call to see if it was ok if he bought ds one. I wasn't too impressed, but he did work for it. I don't like how it came about.

I'm seeing it more and more with him. He wanted an MP3 player for his birthday. we have had some bad luck with MP3, so we got him the same one dh has(clearance as it was being phased out for a new version) a sony. We've had no problems with it. But now he wants an iPod. We had 2 iPod's crash on us. So we got one that was within the alloted birthday budget, that we knew would hold up. In the 2 years dh has had his, and ds for the one year, we've had no issues. But still he wants what he doesn't have.

How do you teach them that happiness isn't getting what you don't have, but being thankful and appreciating what you DO have.

Ok, I know it's sounding like I have a spoiled brat of a son. He is however a very good kid. Athletic, honor student, well liked, a nice small circle of close friends, kids you'd welcome into your home. All of them kinda geeky(this is good thing..lol). He doesn't ask for much. He gets it that money isn't unlimited. But he has that entitlement issue.

He now has a "job" delivering flyers. I want to teach him to manage his money. However, some how it's become a family thing, so he's not getting the full pay. If it becomes an issue, we'll get a second route for his younger sisters and he can do his alone. But how can we teach him to manage it? I was hoping to get him a second account where he can access some of the money. But dh said no, as he'd spend it all every month.

I know this is where the school system has failed, they don't teach real life skills.

I know the younger girls have the gimmes. They want everything that ds has. There is NO way I'm buying them Nintendo Ds when they can't even take care of their $15 tamagotchis. They are too young for that kind of stuff IMO. I can deal with their Gimmes, be dh tends to feel guilty and wants to buy them everything. I can usually curb that.

But with Ds, i think it's time we start dealing with money issues. I want him to know that the only time he should buy on credit, is for a house, and that he should look at paying it off sooner rather than later. A credit card is ok for travelling purposes, or roadside emergencies, where you can't get to the bank, but there should be a bank account equivalent to the credit extended so if the card is used, he should always have the money in the bank so you transfer it instantly and pay no, or minimal, interest.

Ugh... having the "birds and the bees" talk was way easier..lol.
 

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I totally understand what you mean, my older DS's always thought they should have everything even though we didnt have the money but they wound up with it anyways, now my DD wants this or that, new shoes, new sneakers, new clothes, makeup, etc. etc... She knows we cant afford it but since her friends have it she wants it too.

Sometimes I feel bad because I cant go out and get it but for us it's not a issue of wanting it, it's an issue of affording it. We have 2 step-children we pay CS for therefore it takes away from the rest (others may not see it this way) but when we went to court for it, they didnt even include my DD as 1 of Dh's kids, like she meant nothing, that's why sometimes when she asked for a pair of shoes, I feel I should buy it even though she really doesnt need it.

One thing I can say is my kids always know we cant afford it but then ask anyways, lol. Maybe when they get older and have kids of their own they will understand what we've been telling them all these years.... Money doesnt grow on trees (OH how I wish they did!).
 

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I know this is where the school system has failed, they don't teach real life skills.
I understand a lot of what your saying but don't understand this statement at all. Why would it be the schools job? I think it's the parents job to teach them this among many other things.
 

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:yeah:

I agree that it is not the schools responsibility to teach everything to children. The parents are the primary role models and teachers and our best hope is to teach them enough that when it comes to peer pressure they remember their lessons.

As for the sense of entitlement... I have seen this as well. A professor friend of mine also sees it in the university where students feel they are entitled to pass the class with an "A" because they paid for the course. Many professors don't have the time or inclination to stand their ground so they usually just give the grade to avoid the paperwork.


As for teaching it... I think the best bet is to stand your ground. "You have a prefectly good game system right now. If you want to upgrade to something more, earn the money for it and get it." (I have used somehting similar on my spouse and he is of the Gen-X group.) I also have a neice, who at the age of 11, is saving up for her own laptop. She will be helping me out over the summer with some odd jobs around the house to earn her money. She has always had to buy her "joy" items on vacations or when she wants to go to the mall. Holidays and birthdays there are the appropriate gifts, but if she wanted something else... she had to earn it.

Good luck with teaching those skills. They aren't the easiest to learn.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I guess it depends where you are.

In our school system in order to graduate, them must complete a course called "career and life management". They have failed miserably with this program. It was bragged up to teach them some real life skills, handling job and budget, life skills. They failed. Balancing a check book, should be part of a math course. Integrate real life skills into learning. Yes, I agree 100% that parents should teach this. But...look around. Many adults DON'T KNOW HOW to do this themselves. We reach out and feed children who's parent don't. How is this the school responsibility? It isn't, but we do it anyway for those parents who don't take care of their kids. Incorporating something like this, wouldn't be a big stretch, and it would teach all children a USEFUL skill in life.

To save a nation, you must start with it's children. When the parents are declaring bankruptcy, how can they possible have the knowledge to teach their kids?

We graduate kids unable to read. I know many of my peers graduated and can't read, and can barely count out change back to a customer. The school system fails many.

To some extent, we need to teach less of the fancy stuff, and give them good solid basics. Implement some real life skills. Checkbook balancing, creating a budget, learning coping skills, stress management.
 

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http://mysavingsquest.com/

http://www.statefarm.com/learning/kid_stuff/kid_stuff.asp

http://practicalmoneyskills.com/english/index.php

These are just a few websites that I visit with my kids. I am sure if you google you could find alot more. Instead of trying to put the blame on the school system, take the charge and teach your kids. We are our kids first teacher, it was we teach them from day one that counts. Make your teenager part of the budgeting process, if he can come up with a plan to save more money every month on the family budget put that money he saves aside for some of the families wants.
 

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Perhaps teaching the parents that it won't kill them to do "without" may be the best way to teach the kids that they can do "without." I would love for there to be a test that you have to pass before you are considered an adult. I know 15 yr olds that would pass without a problem and 35 yr olds that would fail miserably.

Many school systems fail the children they serve. I know people who graduated unable to read. I have worked with adults who didn't know that 12 is the number of items in a dozen. It is a horror what we have been and are doing to the next generations. It would be great to see lifeskills taught in an appropriate way. But most lifeskills aren't put into use until your on your own. So you can teach 'how to budget' but how do you teach someone to stick to their buget? Some lessons need to be taught the hard way, as the parents who are declaring bancruptcy slowly learn.

But the sense of entitlement really gets under my skin. We live in a throw away society. The amount of money that gets made, spent and thrown away boggles my mind. I know kids that get so many toys they can't and don't play with them. They get stepped on and broken before Christmas day is over and they feel it is ok because Mom and Dad will replace it.

Somewhere along the lines, parents have stopped setting the boundaries. My friend does daycare and she believes the sense of guilt in parents leaving their children with her for the work week makes them give into the every demand of the child. So she finds some kids growing up with the 'me, me, me' syndrome because the parents fail to set the limit. My husband grew up with few limits... and it drives me nuts! There is no sense of delayed gratification, little sense of working to save for somthing that will make it more meaningful. I was raised with a "you don't need that" type of parent so our toys and games were limited and heaven help if it broke because I didn't take care of it. It was NOT replaced.

This attitude of entitlement thread is great. Thank you for starting it. I hope more people are willing and able to give input in how they see it effecting them.
 

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I wish our school had a life schools class as a requirement especially for juniors and seniors in high school. Kids do not understand how the stock market works, how to use a debit or credit card, interest rates, 401k plans, reitrements plans, balancing your bank statement, certificates of deposits, car loans, taxes, etc. The most important thing to me though is for the schools to possibly teach a class about school loans, scholarships, grants, and the REALITY of how much debt one could acquire with loans etc. I believe it is more realilistic to teach these things, then about zygotes. I do agree that our children do believe that they are entitled to things, but they also how the same pressure as adults in keeping up with the Jones's Family. The truth be told the US has really gotten a declining family moral value system. Think about how many people are just rude?? I think we should also be ashamed as humans how we take care of our elderly etc. IMO there are so many different factors that contribute to this. Schools are not responsible for kids being rude and selfish, and spoiled. I work in the schools, it is unbelieveable how students show a lack of respect to authority, to their peers, and it is spiralling out of control. Children need boundries and discipline. There are many great kids too, but if you look at the environment and family life of those smart assed kids, it will tell you the answers. Nature vs. Nurture, you be the judge, I know my answer.
 

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When I see parents with Nintendos, ipods, the very latest in technology( which will soon be "0bsolete"-remember that Twilight Zone episode?)it doesn't surprise me.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I fully believe that I'm my kids first and last educator. I'll never stop reaching out and teaching my kids. I'll not fail my kids. But in general, some one somewhere needs to show the kids some basics to real life. There are things the schools can teach. Some schools do a human sexuality unit, where they have an egg as a baby, some even have electronic babies, to teach them WHY it's important to have safe sex, and babies are a huge responsibility. So why can't they create a life game, where they have an income and things that happen, medical bills, groceries, utilities, loan payments etc. Make it real. If they are lawyers, doctors teachers, accountant, cashier. If they'd gone to school for their careers they should have a student loan to reflect the debt they may incur going to school. Have the choices. 1) live at home or dorm or apartment with room mate. 2) work 1 year prior to college build savings of $x. or work part time or no job, no savings. Give them a debt load that would reflect. Show them what it might cost. Food: make at home or eat out. ETc. Have things come up. Car problems, insurance hikes, trips to dr. out of state wedding to attend. Birthday, Christmas bills etc, lay offs, holidays, etc. I really think this would be a huge benefit to the kids. Yes, it would be a game. But if presented right, with the many factors that we need to face at some point. Yes it might not sink in. But it'll be there in their knowledge base when the time comes. I really think this is something that needs to addressed. Our world is in chaos! Look at how many in our little community that are frugal out of necessity. I'm not knocking anyone. I have more than my share of dumb debt. And I'm working hard on it.

My BIL and SIL in the 6 years they've been in their house, they've refinanced 3 times, maxed out CC yet again. They are due to refinance again. She makes a 6 figure income. He makes nearly that. We make about 1/3 of what they do. We did refinance early, as they had a deal on lower rates. Sped out our mortgage big time, 25 to 13 years :) Yes, we have debt, but as you can see, we are dealing with it. We spend every family gathering listening to how much money she makes. how much she has in company stocks, blah blah blah. Yet, when we did the 40th anniversary MIL and FIL 2 weeks ago, they couldn't afford to split the cost of flowers and the cake.

But this is what gets me. Dh worked on their truck for them. Then they said they couldn't afford to pay him for anything but parts. Family, that's fine. The NEXT week, they pull up in a brand new fully loaded ford truck. Never made an offer to pay for his time.

What is sad though is they have 2 kids. She is 13 and he is 16. They think garage saling is digusting, "we only get NEW things from a store that sells NEW things". No used anything for them. SIl was bragging that between her and her daughter they must have 50 purses. She brags that it's rare that she doesn't go shopping on her lunch breaks. The nephew is level headed, but is particular. He likes his brands, but doesn't need a ton of anything. But he does expect his parents to buy him a car when he gets his license. Had a job for 2 weeks, but quit because they wanted him to work weekends.

And his parents agreed. I'd personally would have put my foot down. If there was something special, then I'd tell him to book it off at least 1 month in advance. Otherwise, too bad. But no, mom and dad said he was in the "right", that he didn't need to "put up with that kind of treatment". Hullo? He's 15 packign groceries, just started. It wasn't abuse, it was scheduling, weekends is what he was hired to work.

Anyway, I'm hoping to avoid those things. I want ds to be able to handle, dealing with what he has. He doesnt' need all the latest toys, electronics, etc. Yes he's earning money. Everyone has said, well if he earns it he can spend it. That's just it! He'll spend every last dime and not have anything saved. We are helping pay for college, but will NOT pay it all. I know many people who's parents gave them a free ride to college and then flunked out of college, partied all the time, even got kicked out. They couldn't care less. Then I've know a few that worked hard to pay their way, some had loans. They worked hard, even struggled, but walked away successful, with an education and many times honors. They understood the value of their $$.

That is what i'm getting at. how do we get the kids to understand the value of what they are making? What is the right approach.

I try to never tell the kids we can't afford something. I know SIL and BIL seem to think we're poor..lol. We don't do expensive holidays, do many many frugal things. This is by choice. Now we're hauling @ss to get outta debt. I want the kids to think it's a conscious choice not to spend on things. We'd rather put it in savings, that spend on something frivolous. Or that we'd rather get X instead of a less likely used y. (groceries instead of video games..lol. Ok, not really a good example..lol). Books are a big one. They love books. I hate the library, I always have overdue books. But I use this, rather than spending $5 on one book from your school book order, we'll wait until the garage sales and we can get it for 25¢. With ds nintendo ds, when he went with his granpa, they were sold out. He'd have spend $165 on the unit with 1 game. So his granpa gave hime a check. I scoured the used ads. We found a unit, 2 months old, WITH a receipt for warranty, and 3 games for $120. He was able to bank $45. He was appreciative of the savings. But he just doesn't get it overall.



There's a recession on the horizon and I want to be debt free before THAT happens. Many people are going to be hurting bad if the interest rates go up even 2%. It is unlikley that mortgages will be at 24% like they were in the 70's and 80's. But I'm not willing to take that chance. I want nothing but utilities and groceries to pay when the recession hits..lol

Ok, done on my soap box. I think I've written a novel(plus I gave myself a project..lol. I'm going to create a life game of some kind to work with my ds on)
 

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So why can't they create a life game, where they have an income and things that happen, medical bills, groceries, utilities, loan payments etc. Make it real.
In highschool i took some great elective classes. One was parenting where we had the electronic babies. Oooh what fun to a 16 year old with twin electronic babies....

I also took a Life Skills class. Now this was only offered to those of us in the learning disabilities program but I wish it would have been offered to all the students. Maybe even required. It taught us how to pay bills, manage finances, budget, how unexpected things can affect your budget. We had to make grocery lists, and keep records of everything. Based on our selected income level and job (drawn out of a hat). If we had "children" (again out of a hat) we had to budget for those things as well. It was the GREATEST class I have EVER taken in my life.
 

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I have told my children we can not afford it. I have told my g-kids, no we can not afford it.I see nothing wrong with that.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
That is exactly what I'm thinking! There has to be a way. There are new millionairs that will a lottery, and in MANY cases, have BLOWN it all within a year. Back to where they were, with nothing.
 

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I also took a Life Skills class. Now this was only offered to those of us in the learning disabilities program but I wish it would have been offered to all the students. Maybe even required. It taught us how to pay bills, manage finances, budget, how unexpected things can affect your budget. We had to make grocery lists, and keep records of everything. Based on our selected income level and job (drawn out of a hat). If we had "children" (again out of a hat) we had to budget for those things as well. It was the GREATEST class I have EVER taken in my life.

This must be a class which is offered to students with learning disabilities because my DD had a similar class which was tied in with her special ed classes. It would be good if it were offered for all students, but I agree that it's primarily my responsibility to teach my kids these skills. My mom often coments on how "good" my kids are (perhaps grandparent's natural bias?;) ) , but she says it's because we're not afraid to tell our kids "no". I think kids see so much on t.v., hear so much on the radio and from thir friends that even when you do tell them "no' and no matter how good a kid they are, there will be times when they are going to want this or that that others have. It's how we as parents handle those wants that will make a difference in how our kids learn about money.


--Michelle
 

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I remember our neighbors growing up. Their allowances and any other money earned was divided three ways. One third went into the bank, one third went into their college fund, and one third was theirs to spend.

You could easily teach your son some budgeting skills and encourage (or set the law) that 50% of his earnings go into the bank, 25% is to put into a christmas fund or for a large item he is saving for (game console or car), and 25% is his to spend. That way he has the benefit of learning how to save, how to delay his wants until he can afford them and how to treat himself immediately. He may find that the reward of saving up for a large luxury item to be worth the discipline it takes to save.
 

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I think your life game is a great idea, have you tried suggesting it to the school and/or the person who is supposed to be teaching the class? I took an economics class in grade eleven where we learned about interest, investments, how to fill out a tax return, and a lot of other real life skills. It was an elective class that happened to be taught by a teacher who primarily taught special education. I think that in a lot of ways, the special ed classes got a better education than the rest of us.

I don't say we can't afford things, because it usually isn't true, instead I say why I choose not to spend our money in such a way (poor value, poor quality, don't need it, not worth it, can do it better ourselves, have something similar already, doing something else instead, etc., etc.) I think it's alright to tell kids when you really can't afford something, but if it is something you wouldn't get even if you could afford it, I think it is better in the long run to give other reasons. My theory being that when they are in a position where they have money of their own, they won't simply blow it on every whim just because they can.

I am generation x and have never felt entitled, neither do my husband, my cousins, brother, or in-laws, or any of the people I grew up with. I had one person in my life with serious entitlement issues. I know people who grew up with less than him, and people that grew up with more, none have the attitude that he has. He is also the only one that felt that he was deprived as a child, even though I know plenty of people who had a lot less and never felt that way. I don't know what the determining factor is, but I know that in my family, all the parents (aunts, uncles, etc.) never appeared dissatisfied with their homes/possessions/lifestyles. Some had more, some had less, but everyone accepted that they had what they had and made the best of it. I think a lot of the deprived feeling comes from hearing parents complain too much about their situation. And I don't mean to imply that you have a bad attitude and it's rubbing off on your child. I'm talking about people that are still like this when they are pushing 40. Your son is a teenager, he's still experimenting with who he is, just because he feels entitled now does not in any way mean that he will continue feeling that way when he is grown up.

And I'm going to take the very unpopular position of agreeing with you about the schools having a responsibility regarding all aspects of children's education. I think that when the government chooses to remove children from their parents at the age of 3 (yes, my children are supposed to start school at 3), place them in an institution 8 hours a day for 14 years, and return them burned out and exhausted with an evening's worth of homework every night, then they are essentially positioning themselves as the child's primary caregiver. If schools essentially deny parents of any meaningful time to interact with their children, how can the parents possibly be expected to fill in all the gaping holes in their child's education? And yes, I am extremely biased, and no, I will not be sending any more of my children to school.

(steps off soapbox, puts on flame-retardant jacket, and ducks)
 

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After reading the posts here (and they are great) I started thinking back on my high school classes. Looking at it from an adult perspective now, it doesn't make since. Those of us that were in the honors program were put into college prep classes, such as Advanced Placement Lit., Physics, etc. The students who made average to low grades were put into the business classes, typing, book keeping, home ec., and life skills. So when I went to college, I knew alot about equations, physics, and classical lit....and nothing about how to budget my money, balance my checkbook, avoiding the credit trap, all of which would have been great considering I was now on my own in a strange city with no parents to guide me or do it for me. Most of the kids who actually learned those skills in high school were still in the comfort of their parents homes. My mother came from a very poor family, my dad made a decent wage when they were first married but then suffered from kidney failure which meant dialysis treatments 3 times weekly and being on disability....he passed away 6 years after this happened. So my mom finished raising the youngest 3 of their 8 kids alone on a fixed income. She ironed other people's clothes and cleaned their houses for extra income..something she could do without sending us to daycare. Budget was never mentioned in our house, my mom was frugal out of necessity, she was a yard sale diva. But she never taught us about money probably because she barely had enough to get by, never any extra to save or invest. So needless to say, I learned the hard way, and with the help of my miserly DH. I am definitely making sure my kids have the life skills I did not. They each have 3 containers, one labeled SAVE, one TITHE, and a SPEND jar. When ever they get ANY money, earned or gift, they have to divide it among the jars, 10 %save, 10% tithe, and the rest spend. We started this about 2 years ago, and so far it works great. Any extra "things" they want between christmas and birthday they have to buy themselves. Hopefully this is the beginning to good money management for them and they won't make as many mistakes in their adult life as I did.
 

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After reading the posts here (and they are great) I started thinking back on my high school classes. Looking at it from an adult perspective now, it doesn't make since. Those of us that were in the honors program were put into college prep classes, such as Advanced Placement Lit., Physics, etc. The students who made average to low grades were put into the business classes, typing, book keeping, home ec., and life skills. So when I went to college, I knew alot about equations, physics, and classical lit....and nothing about how to budget my money, balance my checkbook, avoiding the credit trap, all of which would have been great considering I was now on my own in a strange city with no parents to guide me or do it for me.
I thought about that, also. I was in honors classes in high school and we never had any classes like this. Boy, would it have been helpful to have learned these things back then.


--Michelle
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I see I"m not alone in my thoughts.

My parents did teach me to balance a checkbook. I had a small business growing up. however, they never taught me budgeting. It was always we can't afford it. Rather that explain what was really going on. I did grow up feeling deprived, so the moment I got money it was spent on something. Rather if they'd told me, your brother is in a bad way, and all our extra funds we're chosing to help him. Perhaps I'd have understood. I just could never get clothes, I wore things that were too small. In fact my college fund was given to my brother, he was ill and it was used for esperimental treatments, that didn't work. My mom took my babysitting money that I had been saving to buy groceries. So then I'd spend it as soon as I got it, so she couldn't. Desparate times call for desparate measures. Looking back they ahve regrets as they feel my life path was altered. Perhaps, but I'm a SAHM, and think I'd always be no matter what college I took. But I struggled. There were times I didn't know what I'd eat. I always had shelter. I struggled hard. I incurred a bad credit rating for quite awhile, but you can't get blood from a stone. Now had they taught me budgeting and not forgotten they had other children, perhaps things would be different. But I might not have the wonderful family I have now. And I wouldn't want that. I love them all to pieces.

Looking back, I see where my parents were. I'd do what I could to save a child, but I'm not sure it would be dealt with that way. I earned $15000 a year, and from all of that, expenses a side, I only ever got $300/year for piano lessons. I should have had a nice collenge fund that I had earned. It wasn't a hand out.

Every family has different trials. My parents struggled. They now own a house outright, in fact 2. And for the most part are debt free. Dad has a line of credit, but it gets paid off each time a contract is paid out. But they never taught that. My one brother though passed away now. Was very entitled feeling. He always had debt. Because he was ill, my parents or other brother always bailed him out. when he passed away, he had not a penny to his name. He didn't even have anything to leave to his wife and child. My other brother, he does better. He seems to always have money. But he seems to spend like water. He never seems to fret over bills. BUt at 41 he doesn't even have a home to call his own. They are still renting as they chose to live in an area where even a tiny house is nearly a million.

We may owe alot of debt, but we acknowledge that, and we are working hard to deal with it. And in a few years, we should be mortgage free. The year dh turns 40, and I will be turning 36. That will be a HUGE accomplishment for us. Dh parents raised their family on very little. They didn't buy a house until their kids had moved out. They believed that it was too risky to have a mortgage. They thought whole life insurance was the way to build a savings. BIL still feels whole insurance is a way to build savings :( So leaving it solely to the parents, isn't necessarily a good thing either. Our parents didn't necessarily have the knowledge.

I do have an attitude of entitlement at times :( I'm embarrassed to say. But I deal with it. I've been working hard at it. I do without alot, by choice. And I want the kids to realize that sometimes, there is no or little value to them. It's hard work.

Is it the schools responsibility? I do think it is. It is also the parents responsibility too. I'm not absolving parents from their responsibilities, but the schools, need to work with the kids to make sure they have the necessary skills to survive! On one of the Til Debt do us part, a Dr. was on the verge of bankruptcy because he blew money left right and center. He had NO Idea how to budget. He came from an affluent family as well, you'd think he'd have at least a little bit of an idea. But no.

So, while parents need to take responsibility, the schools need to as well. I remember being preached to about dress code. That in the real world we can't where shorts to work, so why should we be permitted to at school. Yet, there was ALWAYS a festival, fundraiser, this that and the other thing for us to spend money on. In the real world, you can't afford to support every cause, go to every movie, eat out everyday, but the schools allowed it. The schools preached you need to eat healthy, yet sold pop and chips and chocolates on site. There is alot that is lacking.

It's just frustrating. My kids are honor kids. They are polite, they are loved at all homes they visit. So I'm on the right track. I just want to make sure that they are on the right financial track as well.
 

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hot topic! I grew up with out a lot of things, and yes I felt deprived. I also started earning money at age 9 by cleaning neighbors' windows and weeding gardens. I was never without a source of my own income (can you call it income when youre 11? :D. there were many lean years when I was growing up: single mother (in the 70's before it was chic) no other family support, was a latch key kid, and a drunk father who stole our education fund. Im still angry about that one. Never felt entitled tho......except when I had earned my money and wanted to spend it how I chose. wish my mother had had the time to teach me about budgeting and saving, but like other posters have said; when theres not much to go around, theres not much to teach.

Ive already formulated a plan for my little guy: 50% of his bday/xmas money etc is going in his education fund, 25% in savings, and he can choose how to spend the rest. When in highschool and maybe takes a parttime job, he can learn how to spend/plan/budget. Im guarding his edu fund- his daddy would clean it out in a NY minute, but I want little guy to have options for his future.

sorry if this sounds like rambling.......I havent had a full cup of coffee yet so not totally awake:sleepy:
 
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