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I thought of the Frugal Village stockpile friends when I was watching the news of the tsunami and earthquake events. Do you have plans for transport if that type of event happened in your area? I am land-locked so tsunami wont be hitting but I believe we could have an earthquake in general. The news just had me thinking in general.

Is the stockpile for a hunker-down situation more than an evacuation situation or do you have ways of handling both?

I was thinking coolers with wheels would be about all I could take along with me. I'd have to remember dog food weight as well.

So, any coastal stockpilers? If so, just curious to what extent your stockpile is transportable? Any tips/tricks on having to be on the move with supplies?

I just have a small car, do any of you have a larger vehicle for the intent of evacuation situations?

This posting is for discussion/curiosity/planning in general, I don't need help immediately or anything.
 

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Our bug-out plan involves our camper, cash on hand, and credit cards. I know a lot of people here think that's the wrong choice, but the reality is if we have to leave in a hurry, we're not going to have time to do more than hitch up the trailer and load up our seven pets. If we did have time to take anything else, it sure wouldn't be surplus food. It would be things of more value, either monetary or sentimental. Once we're out of the area and out of danger, we can buy whatever we need.

Our biggest risk here is forest fires, so that's our evacuation plan. If we have to evacuate, most likely we wouldn't have time to think about anything but bare necessities. We might be lucky to have time to hitch the trailer.
 

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We are set up to hunker down or evacuate. We have several bags, coolers, crates on wheels to make things easier for me - last year I had to evacuate myself since DH was on another island.

If we need to evacuate, our first choice is my classroom with microwave, refrig and two bathrooms in the room. No electricity? No problem - it's still the place to be.

If we stay home, we'll be on the main, second floor since we are only a football field away from the ocean and the bottom floor is at sea level.

We keep our paper products filled at all times - reminiscent of the time when Hawaii ran out of toilet paper and rice....rice we buy in 20 lb bags and always have one backup.

If need be we could evacuate fully prepared within an hour. It's an important thing to not only think about, but to plan also.
 

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Being set up for camping automatically gives us the gear we would need for an extended stay away from home, so that's handy for us.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
We are set up to hunker down or evacuate. We have several bags, coolers, crates on wheels to make things easier for me - last year I had to evacuate myself since DH was on another island.

If we need to evacuate, our first choice is my classroom with microwave, refrig and two bathrooms in the room. No electricity? No problem - it's still the place to be.

If we stay home, we'll be on the main, second floor since we are only a football field away from the ocean and the bottom floor is at sea level.

We keep our paper products filled at all times - reminiscent of the time when Hawaii ran out of toilet paper and rice....rice we buy in 20 lb bags and always have one backup.

If need be we could evacuate fully prepared within an hour. It's an important thing to not only think about, but to plan also.
Leave in an hour, wow. Other than a fire in my own house sending me running for the street, I could not pull off actually evacuating that quickly. I'd be throwing toilet paper rolls at the dogs and yelling FETCH! Get in the car! wait come here, wait sit! get your leash on, Wait! I just picture chaos.

A plan is good.

Spirit deer, 7 pets, ya my pets come to mind in particular when it comes to evacuating. Supplies are everywhere in my house, I need to figure something out. A grab & go bag or something.
 

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We also have bug out bags ready here at home. . . we have smaller bags in each car and I have a bag at work.

We have several caches set up at various places around the state and a few in other states (all set by GPS).

We have planted several hidden "gardens" at various places , also set by GPS, for foods.

My dog has his own bug out bag, and he's been trained to carry his bag (saddle bag style), and pull a small cart if needed.
 

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I don't have a bug-out plan. I think hunkering down is my only current option. I drive an older car and don't really have anyplace to go.

The plan, however, is to be able to purchase a retreat with cash at some point in the next 5 years. It won't be much - probably just a camper on some land near some water, but it will be ours. I pray we don't need it before then.

We aren't on a fault line and don't have any real extreme weather scenarios that are likely and I have wracked my brain with other types of scenarios. I feel our best bet as a family of a mom and two girls, is to hunker down and wait it out in most situations.

As far as the hunker down situation goes, I've been stockpiling like crazy lately and have plans to equip our apartment with alternate sources of heat and cooking equipment.

I was definitely thinking about the stockpile this morning. I read about the millions without electricity, food and water in Tokyo and felt some small comfort in our little prepping efforts. I read about families with elderly members that were unable to get to their apartments on high floors with the elevators broken.

All these earthquakes lately really bring home the fact that we have to prepare while there is still time - that time could be up in the blink of an eye.
 

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I live on the coast of WA and I keep a stockpile at both here and at our mountain cabin. You never know when either an earthquake or volcanic eruption (we're also near Mt St Helen) might happen. If the event is large enough it will disrupt normal daily functions, so at least a few weeks supplies at both houses are necessary. It's just good insurance...you never know...
 
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