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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My son has been diagnosed with schizophrenia....there is no family history of it....no drug/alcohol abuse...no promiscuity. I had known for awhile that there was something that "wasn't right". I was finally able to talk him into getiing some help (hard to do when its an adult you're dealing with)Don't know what else to say except "why my son?"
How can I help him? I feel lost.
 

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For now, learn as much as you can and be there for him.

many hugs to you.
 
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Many hugs and blessings to you. I agree with C. try to learn as much as you can for him, and just be there. We are here for you if you need us.
 
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The biggest struggle with schizophrenia is that when the person with it most needs help, he/she is least likely to realize it. Being in frequent contact and encouraging him to take his meds faithfully will be a huge help.

Let him know that you love him and he's not "defective", which is sometimes how people with this dx can feel about themselves.
 

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While it's good to know what is going on with your son and that there is a diagnosis for it, it's so challenging when you move on to the next step. Unfortunately this is one disease that shows itself in teenage and early 20s.

Have they offered medication yet? Is there a family support group where you live?

Sending prayers, hugs and aloha to you all. It's a step by step process.
 
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Gut and Psychology Syndrome: Natural Treatment for Autism,ADD/ADHD,Dyslexia,Dyspraxia,Depression,Schizophrenia (Paperback)
by "Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride MD. MMedSci(Neurology). MMedSci(Nutrition)"

The nutritionist we saw (along with many others) put schizophrenia on the same spectrum as autism, depression and such. She recommended the book I listed above. The book is a difficult read and I've had to read and reread it but it is loaded with info on how the brain works and associated info.




 

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2nd GenGranola

I have to agree with the GAPS doctor based on my own family history (my grandmother was schizophrenic) and the research I've done on my own over the last few years.

many houseapes -is there a history of autoimmune disease in your family, IBS, celiac, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders? Have you trialed a diet change? Is your son addicted to carbs/sugar? Does your son complain about stomach problems?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
While it's good to know what is going on with your son and that there is a diagnosis for it, it's so challenging when you move on to the next step. Unfortunately this is one disease that shows itself in teenage and early 20s.

Have they offered medication yet? Is there a family support group where you live?

Sending prayers, hugs and aloha to you all. It's a step by step process.
Yes, he started his medication last night & I'm looking into a family support group.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
2nd GenGranola

I have to agree with the GAPS doctor based on my own family history (my grandmother was schizophrenic) and the research I've done on my own over the last few years.

many houseapes -is there a history of autoimmune disease in your family, IBS, celiac, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders? Have you trialed a diet change? Is your son addicted to carbs/sugar? Does your son complain about stomach problems?
He has ulcerative colitus
 

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The son of a friend of mine - actually there was another family with a son with schizophrenia too - so that's two - higher percentage of males are diagnosed. The first son was very successful in living a fulfilling life when he was taking his medications. The second son's life was not an easy road - a late diagnosis and reluctance to take any medication. A challenge seems to be that they feel so good when on meds that they decide to go off them.

NAMI is a wonderful resource for everyone in your family, including and especially your son. Please let us know what's happening - you know we are concerned and care.
 
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Be absolutely CERTAIN he takes his meds. Persons with schizophrenia often resist / hide meds - but the meds make life so much better for them. and their families.
Praying for you today.
 
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My husband's family has a history of mental illness on one side. It has hit several of his immediate family members with everything from extreme shyness (possibly a phobia), to anxiety and panic attacks, to hoarding, to schizophrenia. His youngest sister had a three year odyssey with pain associated with a bad gall bladder. Within months of having it out, she ended up with a diagnosis of schizophrenia.

Balancing meds with support and the person's independence is important. One of the biggest things I have seen is that the line the mental illness comes through, everyone agrees grandma has dementia and hoarding. No one talks about her kids who may or may not have issues. But the grandkids with problems, everyone talks about them and helps out. The only reason grandma is discussed is because she is old and it is acceptable to talk about dementia in relation to old people. They don't talk about her history from when she was raising her kids but it is there in the background of a lot of stories.

Bringing it out into the open has helped the grandkids (at least in my husband's part of the family) that have issues. They are honest and open about having an episode, needing support and taking meds. By talking about it, they are holding themselves accountable. If we listen, we can tell if they are starting to lose it and need extra help via therapy, drugs, diet or whatever.

The sister that has it is in school taking what classes she can handle and trying to get back into her hobbies from before both illnesses. It can take time to get back on track if he really got lost but encourage your son to do it.

Good luck with it all.
 

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I made a vow last year. I promised myself that if it was useful, I'd step out of the "mental illness closet" whenever I could help people by doing so.

I suffer from depression, anxiety and sometimes agoraphobia. I've been on and off of medications for much of m adult life. I'm sure it's been no picnic for my kids.

Things I have learned that are worth sharing:

~ Meds help -they can change your life.
~ You don't always get the right meds the first time. Sometimes it is the 4th or 5th med "cocktail" they give you that finally kicks in and makes you feel better. Sometimes the first few kinds make you feel worse. It's all trial and error.
~ Side effects suck but they generally go away after a month or two and life returns to "somewhat normal"
~ Journalling really helps to recognize when you are backsliding. For me, the symptoms are always the same. I can't get myself motivated to do anything. Just making a bowl of cereal is a struggle. I start feeling achy and flulike and then I start coming up with reasons to miss work. I avoid phone calls and communications. Knowing this helps me to stop relapses before the get bad and damage my life
~ Things that would cause some situational emotional issues for "normal" people can send people with a mental illness into a tailspin.
~ Nothing shows you who your real friends are like mental illness - they are the ones who keep calling back when you don't answer the phone and finally come and bang on your door until you answer. They are the ones that bring you a nutritious meal during rough times and help you with getting your kids to their various activities. They are the ones who don't give up on you and they are few and far between.

I hope this helps. I know I don't suffer from the same illness that your son does but there are some similarities. My heart goes out to you and him and I am so happy you were able to help him help himself.

(Please note the information regarding going through many different meds - this happens very frequently.)
 

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You have my prayers. He absolutely must stay on his meds Often times they will say they are taking them when they are not. They will get to feeling better and then think they don't need them. As others said...learn all you can.
 
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You, your son, and your family are in my thoughts and prayers. Educate yourself and your son. That way he can choose, along with his dr, the best course of treatment. No two people are alike so what works for one may not work for another.

I am wishing you all the best. Your son deserves it.
 
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As a person who has suffered from some issues throughout my life (severe depression and anxiety) I would say the number one thing you can do is be accepting of him and realize that it is an illness and not his fault. Get him the help he needs but please view this as a disease not "weakness" on his part. When I was first diagnosed I was in a psych ward and my best friend called my mom to let her know. She said "what is she doing there?she should come home where I can take care of her" Total denial from her. Then I got in "trouble" many times by her over the years and she was less than understanding of my sister who has the same issues. She just couldnt understand how hard "normal life" is for someone with these problems.....of anything I went through with all my mental health problems my mothers rejection of me "as a person" (when I couldnt help it) was the worst :(
 
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