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The stockpiling thread got me thinking about what we might have learned and want to share during this time. Did you stockpile enough? Did you have a plan? Did you have money saved? Did something unexpected happen? Did something you planned for happen? What are you learning about yourself? What have you learned about others?
 
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I have learned that lot of younger generation i know (I am just saying the ones i know about hope others are not like this) are only worried about what they can get for their self now not worried about what next month or next year will be like if they have money it got to be spent today. Not on food and paying bill and necessary things. Even some thinks the government will keep bailing people out.
 
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I have learned that I am even more introverted than I thought. I learned that my daily interaction with coworkers was draining me much more than I thought. I have learned that even though I have learned to be more extroverted at work, it has not actually made me more extroverted.

I have learned that I can make my self act more extroverted, but that does not mean I actually am more extroverted.

People say that everyone is a mix of introvert and extrovert but favoring one over the other. I think that is true or maybe mostly true. But being very introverted is also much different than being moderately introverted. So maybe that is why some of the introvert advice I see does not work for me.

Well, having some emotional breathing space is giving the opportunity to go over lots of other things in my mind.

In terms of frugal things, nothing much as changed. Things I was doing helped me out. And I keep doing them.
 

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I have learned what stores to rely on and what stores not to rely on. Getting constant emails from all companies "we are here for you" - except some of them don't really mean it and were not prepared to deliver on their promises. Greatly appreciate all the delivery people. Really annoyed with all the people who only come out and walk the paths because they cannot go shopping/gym/restaurants, etc. And walk along with their faces stuck to their phones cluelessly hogging the whole path so I get to walk in the mud to avoid them.
 

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One thing I have learned is "Save your money !" I've been doing ok. I'm lucky enough to be working where I do. A lot of my friends on the other hand have been laid off from their jobs or reduced hours or even closed businesses.

Another thing I learned is that I am more of an extrovert than I thought ! I'm actually bored living by myself in this weird time. Hopefully things will get back to normal fairy soon.
 

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I was lucky that I was prepared.....I have enough I can share with my family. But, I'm not able to replenish my supply as much as I would like as I am on lockdown so husband does the shopping and I am blessed that he does it but he doesn't like it and I can't ask him to shop like I use to.....I finally have him convinced to buy toilet paper everytime he goes to the store.
I am hoping this shows the young people that they need a stockpile and an emergency fund. Any amount is better then none. You can't depend on the government to take care of you.
I learned I do not like being at home and not seeing people....I am a real people person. My husband says I start a conversation with anyone.....
Hope everyone is safe and healthy.
 

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CH- I'm going to answer "yes" to most of those questions. Like the Boy Scout motto, "Always Be Prepared," I try to do that. The only thing that I didn't think of until February was masks/gloves/disinfectant wipes. Luckily, I was able to get them before they sold out.

People acted as I thought they would. Getting into fights at the market, screaming/threatening workers, thinking this was a joke and not taking it seriously, etc.....

Is this a test of some sort? I wouldn't doubt it.
I consider myself a old-fashioned, old-school person and I do what I know and it works. I had this conversation with DS2 and he understands that I'm a bit of a oddity in that respect but listens to me anyway. I read and learn a lot and remember what my mom taught me. I stockpile food/meds/water/prepper stuff and didn't need to rush out when things went downhill. I'm glad that the family is safe, even though being cooped up is boring. Using my cardio equipt helps me a lot. Who knew that my 2nd job that I took 4+ years ago would end up being essential.
 

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I have found out that my faith muscle is fairly strong. I also found out that I am very adaptable, things change and I can pretty easily change with them. We are debt free and also keep our monthly bills few and low so even though we are not working, bills are easily paid for and charitable contributions continue. We do have a large monthly health ins. payment (a 1/4 of our yearly earnings goes toward health ins. premiums) that comes out of DH's check so are prepared to cover that also when he goes back to work. We have a emergency fund but will not have to dip into it. I will probably keep a little more of a stockpile than I used to pre-Covid 19, had plenty of non food items but should have had more food items on hand. I miss hugging people and seeing my friends and family although I probably talk to them more now than I used to, which is a good thing. I think in years to come we will all look back on this time and see how in some ways it changed us for the better.
 

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I have learned to have more of a stockpile of things I need (like famotidine!). I have also learned not to deny myself what I want. "Life is uncertain, eat dessert first!" I am frugal more by choice than by necessity. So if I want the good jam or the good coffee, I am going to get it.

I miss hugs too!
 

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I am also frugal by choice but also selectively frugal. I will occasionally splurge on a thing but then get very frugal with other things.

My husband and I splurged on the world's most expensive board game. On the other hand we were planning to go to a large board game convention that got cancelled. So we are still ahead on money there.

I think many of the frugal things are stuff I really like, not things I am settling for. I like homemade food. I like a lot of simple foods. I enjoy making stuff out of old clothes.

And I like concerts on my TV screen rather than live. Well I do like live music but only if there is a small audience. Large groups are a bit overwhelming for me. I sometimes joke that I like unpopular groups. In other words groups not popular enough to get a large audience.😛

I try to live my best life and be frugal at the same time. For a hard core introvert this is close to my best life.
 

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KathyB: I too am learning to appreciate my introversion. I have SO MUCH MORE energy at the end of the day even working from home in my 135square foot shed/home. It's cramped, but I'm not interupted all the time. I work with extreme extroverts and it drains me.

ALso, that I am better at stockpiling than I thought. I have useful stuff and enough. An excellent first aid kit. Someone told me about 2 months ago to keep benadryl or the equivalent offbrand benadryl in the first aid kit...it really helped when I messed up with my beekeeping and got 20 stings last saturday. 1 benadryl and the swelling and itching was gone enough that I could sleep. The old boyscout first aid book I picked up in the community free book bin came in handy too.

And that I have plenty. I don't need more. I have enough clothes. I have enough food. I have property to forage on so today dinner was dandelion greens frittata with my own eggs (well...my chicken's eggs), and a single mushroom I happened to find and identify.
I have books on edible and medicinal plants so I can identify things before I eat them, and have had a lesson in how to proceed with caution the first time you try a foraged food.

And I learned that while I love hitting the thrift stores on the weekend, I can live without it just fine. At least until my jeans stockpile runs out!

Unlike some others, I'm finding the younger generation here, in a rural area, quite resourceful. They are mostly behaving and being super helpful.
 

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I find that I do not miss things as much as I thought I would.

For example, I really like the museums that are near my work. But I have not been in them for awhile since my office has gone to full time telework.

I think part of that is that museums are an introvert friendly environment. Even if they are crowded, people tend to be a bit quieter than normal. I do really like art too.

The point is that when contemplating retirement cities I felt like the quality of museums was very important. Now it feels less important. I still would like a nice art museum or two but it is okay if it is not one of the top museums in the country.

Events in a mid sized city might be more suited to me than similar larger events in a bigger city.
 

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I have learned that I need to keep my pantry stocked. I was low in a lot of things, especially toilet paper. I used to stock a lot, but didn't rotate it, and it just started falling apart, barely usable. I'm going to clear a spot on the shelves for the toilet paper so I can rotate it better. Also stocking up on dog and cat food. I would just buy it when I needed it. Now I have enough for 6-12 months.

The most important thing I've learned from all this is, I don't need to go to a restaurant to eat. Carry out/drive thru is good enough. I don't need to sit at a dirty table next to someone hacking up a lung to eat dinner. I'm cooking at home more. Well, dh does some of it too. Most times we cook enough that we only cook 2-3 times a week.

We also don't let anything go to waste. We find a use for it. Food, we eat it, repurpose it, or put in the freezer for later. Lots of banana bread for the overly ripe bananas. Good thing dgd loves banana bread!
 

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Great thread, @Contrary Housewife. I was well prepared, thank goodness. I buy my food in bulk at Costco, so I had done a big shop a week or so before people began to panic. My mom taught me to keep a stockpile, which I eat from and use daily. I was very glad that I had been living frugally for so many years, and building up the emergency fund. My yarn stash came in handy for knitting, notebooks for journaling, and favorite books for reading. I have been really enjoying the simple daily activities: riding my bike with my dog running on the Walkydog, doing yoga or pilates at home each evening, sitting out on the porch and soaking in the energy of the garden, growing food, etc. I also have gotten a kick out of all of the neighborhood kids. They are all so friendly and enthusiastic when they see me. It lifts my spirits and warms my heart. I've been making time each day to train my dog, and that has worked wonders. This pandemic taught me how may dogs need attention, discipline, and boundaries. I have always loved cooking, and cooked at home. I am so glad that I took a few cruises the past few years. I had hoped to travel in my fifties, but now we may not be able to. So, hiking and exploring state parks may be the plan B. I am grateful that I live in a small town that has gorgeous mountains and trees. It makes all the difference. Location...
 

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I was prepared w/ stuff. But I let things get disorganized and had become a bit mentally sloppy. My skill levels are rusty and I have no stamina and move slow now. I am digging in and plodding on. Reupping some old skills and working on learning more. SO blessed to have money.income,supplies and paid bills BUT more the right attitude to head in not sit around waiting for someone to "fix this". or do things for me.
 

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I think attitude is pretty important. For most of my adult life I have tried to always think "how can I make the best of this."

I have gone through some times where the circumstances were pretty bad. I always tried to think how could I make this better. How could I make this less bad.

Well maybe not always, but at least most of the time.

Even if the situation is beyond my control, I can still do some things to make it a little better for myself, a little easier to deal with.
 

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I learned that by going with my heart instead of my brain, and paying off my mortgage years ago as opposed to investing, may have been the right idea at the moment. While things could change, and investments could continue to have the long-term advantage, I'm glad I don't have the stress of making sure I made my house payments on time.

I've learned that some people I thought were relatively normal are actually pretty unhinged. I'm not talking about disagreements over things, I'm talking about raging conspiracy theories over easily-proven facts.

I've learned that my family is more adaptable than we initially thought. Teaching a delayed kindergartner from home, IEPs included, has been a challenge that both my wife and son have powered through. My 4 year old daughter hasn't really had her life uprooted a whole lot.

I've learned that while there are benefits to working from home, I would still rather go to the office.

I've learned that pressure canning, buying in bulk (pre-covid), cooking at home 99% of the time, knowing what to do with scraps and stretching every part of a food item, have all helped us to maintain a pretty good and varied diet without wasting much. I don't really buy in bulk right now, even though it's available, simply to make sure there is something there for people who finally made it to the store.

I've also learned that by not being able to shop the deals as often, or been able to peruse the clearance aisle once or twice a week, my food costs have increased.
 

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I have learned that I can rely on my skills. It was kind of a test run.
I always have enough food, hygiene items, water, ... at home.
I can bake, cook, sew a lot. I have fruit and vegetables in the garden and homemade preserves in the basement.
Life in the country is easier in the event of a crisis than in the city.
 

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We were in the Panama Canal on a cruise when the pandemic hit. I was most worried about getting home because of countries locking borders down etc. We received notice that our flights were still on and that the cruise line was shutting down after we disembarked.

Once we landed at home turf it was bizarre to drive home and see so many empty parking lots, no people etc.

I stopped and got milk, bread, flour and yeast (so I could make the bread if we didn’t get out for a while). I did grab a pack of TP as dh was worried...got home and counted that we already had 70 rolls. LOL. That reassured him. Otherwise I had plenty of food and such in the pantry and freezer etc. I’ll stick to my usual habits of stocking and call it good.
 

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I have also learned that I don't need a lot to be happy. I have zero desire to go out to eat or go to large gatherings. If I drive by a yard sale and there are a lot of people there, I keep driving. There is nothing I want that much. Other people, it seems, can't wait. Just got a news flash that a vendor at a local farmers' market tested positive. How many people were they in contact with? Hopefully it was only brief contact.
It seems like everyone is itching to get back to "normal" even if they have to force it and be unsafe. Not me. I think of people who are on the space station, or in Antarctica, or in the military overseas. They go months without going to bars and restaurants. And somehow they survive.
 
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