Frugal Village Forums banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Founder
Joined
·
19,054 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
do you think are most important for kids to learn?

My mom tried very hard to teach me as many life skills as possible while I was growing up. The problem is that some I simply didn't want to learn some skills (sewing, canning and needlework come to mind).

What life skills do you teach your kids (or want to) or think are important for them to have before they're out on their own? And how have you implemented or plan to implement teaching these skills?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Early Bird

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,626 Posts
I have a list of them...Since we homeschool it's pretty easy for us to add in a course called (surprise) Life Skills. They know (or in the little one's case WILL know) how to:

Cook
Simple machine repair
replace a door/window basic home repair
change a tire/oil other basic car repair
fishing
raise a garden
raise chickens/ducks
how to do laundry and how to erect a clothes line inside or out
balance their checking account
how to save money and reduce bills
they'll all be taught our trade (Hubby and I own our own business)
etc...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,575 Posts
Gardening.
How to turn the TV OFF and enjoy the out of doors.
Money management.
Basic tools.
Oil changes.
simple cooking skills
 

·
Moderator aka AmyBob
Joined
·
12,038 Posts
I want to teach my children:

money management
how to care for children
general housekeeping skills (so they don't live in stys)
cooking

Other than that, the truth is, we have no ideas what the essential life skills will be when our children are adults. Sara, your mom wanted you to learn needlework and sewing, but as an adult, it's not a skill that you need to survive. When our kids are adults, will they need to learn how to do certain things that we want them to know? Probably not. It's a hard question to answer, particularly in today's changing world!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
314 Posts
Social skills
Critical thinking skills, especially the ability to recognize and see beyond our own natural biases
Healthy habits, both physically and financially
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
867 Posts
time management

ability to independently learn stuff

research skills to support independent learning

knowing how to assess oneself when confronted with new life experiences
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,747 Posts
-How to balance a checkbook
-How to count back change
-How to tell time on an analog clock
-How to read a map
-How to fill out a job application/write resume


Surprising how many people do not know how to do these simple things.

Living out in the country there is not much opportunity to learn how to use public transportation. When DS1 started working/needed to get somewhere he was at a loss. He didn't even know what options were available to him. We dropped the ball on that one, and had to plan excursions to teach him how to use the bus/train. So I'll add knowing how to use public transportation.

-Manners, etiquette
-How to write a thank note
-How to apologize properly- For the record it's not "uh yeah, sorry you feel that way" BOYS!
 

·
Member
Joined
·
27,948 Posts
This one really has me thinking. My answer here isn't probably what your looking for but to me is one of the most important "skills" I tried to give my kids.
I agree with all that been mentioned but wanted to add that one of the best things I think I did as a parent was not shelter my kids from everything. How can you stand on your own two feet if you haven't felt those hard knocks and learned how to deal with them? They need to feel sadness, disapointment, failure along with all the good things. You can't always get the trophy/job/whatever but it gives you something to strive for, to challenge yourself to do better to not give up. How can they feel the pride of a battle hard fought if you don't let them fight the fight?
Being helicopter parents or on teams where everyone gets a trophy and nobody keeps score, or in a classroom where the teacher can't use a red pen to write down a grade on a bad paper because someones feelings will be hurt doesn't help our children at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,566 Posts
Money Management
NO WORK, NO EAT!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
I want my children to leave knowing how to :
cook a meal
clean
money management
dealing with people

These are not covered under a classic school education but are necessary for survival
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,743 Posts
Besides cooking and cleaning (which are SO important), I think how and where to purchase the things you need - AKA shopping. Especially how shopping is NOT a form of recreation!

I would also say how to approach the basic area of work - how to work, how to work hard, going the extra mile, oragnizing work, working efficiently and staying with the work until it's DONE.

To accomplish this, I have always had my kids work beside me - none of this 'you watch a video and when Mommy's done with her work, we'll have some fun'. Arrrgghhhh.... this drives me nuts to hear parents say this.

We have volunteered at church, at our 4H fair, and this summer, both of my younger kids have gone on mission trips - one to NYC and DS is currently in Iowa on a Habitat for Humanity build.

A person who knows how to WORK will be a leg up on life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,038 Posts
I think money management and budgeting is a sorely overlooked skill in may households. I hope by having an allowance when a little older, my kids will learn about saving for goals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,244 Posts
Strong reading/writing/math - schools are falling short
money management
household management
laundry
cooking
sewing
yard care
general vehicle maintenance
driving

I agree, learning that not everyone wins, not everyone gets a good grade. But also that you don't need to put up with people abusing you. That family sticks together and supports each other.

I agree with what Darlene said. That they need to learn with difficult people, but at the same time, if the authorities that be aren't helping you with dealing with them and trying to provide a safe work(school) environment, it's time to leave. No one needs to put up with that kind of abuse. Kids need to learn there is a limit, and if that line has been crossed, it's ok to leave.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,898 Posts
My thoughts differ depending on which of my children I am thinking about. I would like them to all be great money managers, cooks, housekeepers and socialites - but they each have their own strengths and weaknesses and I know they will always struggle in certain areas.

We tend to concentrate on social skills with my son, because it's been an area that causes him significant anxiety. I probably won't ever need to teach him any concrete skills, as he is obsessed with tutorial videos - but I would like to teach him to stop talking like he's in one.

My oldest is extremely resistant to coaching on any subject, but her money habits are particularly distressing to us - I honestly don't care if she ever learns to clean or cook, I just want her to know how to get and keep money in her pocket. I doubt she will ever drive, and I don't think she should, but years ago I would have considered that a skill that I'd expect my children to learn.

I don't know with my youngest yet, but I know that she already has better social skills than I'll ever have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
870 Posts
Ditto on knowing how to change a tire, cook, fishing and hunting.

I also think knowing how to count back change to someone after a sale is invaluable. It keeps you and the customer accountable and also keeps you from relying on technology to do the thinking for you.

Others:
Speaking clearly (I HATE mumbling!)
Articulate a thought clearly
Write a thank you note
Write a letter (um...does anyone write these anymore?)
Basic sewing
First aid
Balancing a checkbook
Setting a budget
VOLUNTEERING
Knowing how to research something or be resourceful to find an answer and not just rely on "well, I'll ask mom or dad"
How to play/interact fairly and lose well as well as win well
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,300 Posts
After looking at some of my adult friends...

Social skills - how to say hello, how to have a conversation
how to compose a letter (still valuable with email today)
how to stand in line
taking turns
using the post office
table manners
budgeting, saving, living within your means
 
  • Like
Reactions: Luckybustert

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,367 Posts
Manners. Not just table manners--opening the door for ladies and anyone older than them. Offering assistance, helping carry...

Social skills. (How to have a convo with adults, shaking hands, using Mr. Mrs. Fr. Sr., respect, etc).

Simple household cleaning.

Basic Cooking.

Lawn care.

How to handle finances, although they still call DH for advice on investing, etc.

Life isn't fair. But you should be.

Honesty.

No means NO when it comes to women. And other gentlemanly skills....

Work hard. Don't whine.

Grocery shopping, and what is a scam or stupid purchase, and what isn't.

Washing laundry. + folding, hanging, etc.

Some medical skills (first aid and such--hey, I'm a nurse, LOL!)

Babysitting skills.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,367 Posts
OH! And my boys can sew on a button, or stitch up a tear in a garment.

:hugz:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,004 Posts
What life skills do you teach your kids (or want to) or think are important for them to have before they're out on their own? And how have you implemented or plan to implement teaching these skills?

I hope that I have taught my children money management skills. When the older two boys were in high school and working, we set them up with their own checking accounts. I taught them how to balance their account so that they would be able to do it own their own once they moved out. Other skills I hope that I have taught them are to how to cook simple meals and to clean. They also know how to do their own laundry.....and often times they do all the laundry for me. :) DH has taught them basic mechanic skills, like how to change a tire, change the oil, and change the spark plugs and wires on the car. These skills will hopefully get them started in their life on their own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,854 Posts
All of my kids learned the following, no sexist divisions here.

simple sewing and mending
simple car repair (change tire, change hoses, etc.)
balance a checkbook
gardening - and putting food by
hunting - and butchering (small animals, chickens, fish, rabbits)
hand laundry and hang clothing
foraging and survival skills
cook a simple meal from basic ingredients (not box mixes)
house cleaning

Courtesy and respect
Think outside the box
concern for others


How do/did we accomplish this?

We spent time together *gasp* doing these things. In the summer, we'd schedule a day a week for "life skills" . . . during the school year, we just did them as part of our daily life.

I'd do some pretend scenarios for various situations at times - maybe give them a few items, and tell them to built something for xxxx. . . or what would you do if xxxx happened. . . . or how can you do this, without this happening?

Each of my kids did missions work for various organizations (not all church based). . . . and they'd volunteer at the area nursing homes, etc.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top